LJMU English Lecturer to Teach in China

LJMU English Lecturer to Teach in China

LJMU English's Alice Ferrebe is leaving for China this week, to teach a short course based upon her research specialism to students at Shanghai University, as part of their International Term. Undergraduates at SU study for a total of four years, and in the third term of their first year, they are able to select a range of modules designed and taught by academics from abroad. Alice will be teaching a literature module focussed upon the representation of youth in post-Second World War British writing, which will draw upon material used in LJMU English's Level 4 'Literature in Context' course. Alice said, 'I was lucky enough to be able to visit the Chinese Literature department at Shanghai University last year, and ever since then I've been wondering what it would be like to teach British culture and literature to Chinese students. I've become obsessed with the idea of finding out what students from such a different background might make of Alan Sillitoe's short story...
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LJMU Lecturer on BBC Radio 3’s Free Thinking

LJMU Lecturer on BBC Radio 3’s Free Thinking

As part of the BBC and AHRC New Generation Thinkers scheme, Dr Nadine Muller recorded her first broadcast for national radio at the Hay Festival on Monday, 25 May 2015. The programme, which introduces four of this year's New Generation Thinkers, was broadcast on Thursday, 28 May 2015, and you can listen to it here. In it, Nadine provides a snapshot of her research on the literary and cultural history of widows in Britain, a topic on which you'll be able to hear more on Free Thinking later on in the year. ...
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Dr Nadine Muller Announced as One of This Year’s New Generation Thinkers

Dr Nadine Muller Announced as One of This Year’s New Generation Thinkers

The nationwide search for the brightest minds with the potential to share their cutting-edge academic ideas via radio and television is over, and we're delighted to say that our very own Dr Nadine Muller is one of them! BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) have unveiled the ten academics - and their research - who will be the New Generation Thinkers 2015. Nadine has worked on projects exploring the Victorians in the 21st century, as well as carrying out research relating to women and belief. As a New Generation Thinker, she will be broadcasting her research on the history of widows in British literature and culture in order to share it with the public. New Generation Thinkers 2015 has been a successful first step for many academics, with previous thinkers going on to appear across television and radio. The ten New Generation Thinkers 2015 were selected from over five hundred applications from academics at the start of their careers, who...
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Congratulations LJMU English Graduates!

Congratulations LJMU English Graduates!

Monday wasn't the sunniest day, but the Graduation of our 'Class of 2015' was still a brilliant occasion. Congratulations to all the single- and joint-honours students who have studied with us over the last three (or so) years: we were delighted that so many of you came back to the John Foster building for a drink and a strawberry or two to celebrate. Please do keep in touch and let us know all the amazing things you get up to, either via individual tutors or via this website. As you can see, the gallery below is somewhat dominated by pictures of your tutors looking daft impressive in their robes. If you'd like to add some of your own pictures of the festivities to the LJMU English site (yourself looking daft, or daft, or just plain gorgeous in your robe, for instance), please just email them to Alice Ferrebe (High resolution, medium size, if possible!) with a sentence confirming your permission. We wish all our graduates...
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PhD Success: Judge David Lynch

PhD Success: Judge David Lynch

Judge David Lynch, an Honorary Fellow of LJMU, gained his PhD with flying colours in May 2015. His thesis on ‘The Role of the Circuit Courts in the Development of Federal Justice’ makes a significant contribution to literature on the development of early American law and was passed without emendations. When he retired from the Bench David embarked on an MRes in Literature and Cultural History and completed his Masters in 2011. Rather than relaxing into retirement, he then began working towards his Doctorate. His Director of Studies was Dr Colin Harrison, whose own research is on North American cultural history and his supervisory team included Professor Glenda Norquay (English) and Dr Carlo Panara (Reader in Law). With the encouragement of the External Examiner, Professor Penny Darbyshire, Kingston Law School, David (now 75) is now planning to produce a book out of his research....
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Scotland & The Caribbean, c.1740-1833: Michael Morris’s New Book

Scotland & The Caribbean, c.1740-1833: Michael Morris’s New Book

Since joining LJMU English in June 2014, Dr Michael Morris has completed his first book, which participates in the modern recovery of the memory of the long-forgotten relationship between Scotland and the Caribbean. Drawing on theoretical paradigms of world literature and transnationalism, it argues that Caribbean slavery profoundly shaped Scotland’s economic, social and cultural development, and draws out the implications for current debates on Scotland’s national narratives of identity. Eighteenth- to nineteenth-century Scottish writers are re-examined in this new light. Michael's book explores the ways that discourses of 'improvement' in both Scotland and the Caribbean are mediated by the modes of pastoral and georgic which struggle to explain and contain the labour conditions of agricultural labourers, both free and enslaved. The ambivalent relationship of Scottish writers, including Robert Burns, to questions around abolition allows fresh perspectives on the era. Furthermore, Michael considers the origins of a hybrid Scottish-Creole identity through two nineteenth-century figures - Robert Wedderburn and Mary Seacole. The final chapter moves forward to consider the...
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Mobilities & Place: A Multidisciplinary Travel Symposium

Mobilities & Place: A Multidisciplinary Travel Symposium

On Saturday May 9th 2015, LJMU English will host the ‘Mobilities and Place’ Symposium. This will be the ninth annual Liverpool Travel Seminar, organised by Liverpool John Moores University, in collaboration with the University of Liverpool and Liverpool Hope University. In addition to keynote speakers including Dr. Catherine Armstrong (University of Loughborough), Professor Simon Bainbridge (University of Lancaster) and Dr. Debbie Lisle (Queen’s University, Belfast), the symposium will feature four panels of international delegates. LJMU's Dr. Kate Walchester, whose research specialism is in nineteenth century travel narratives, said, ''From the range and diversity of papers the symposium promises to be an exciting event. The Liverpool Travel Seminar is an established forum for interdisciplinary debate and this year's event will extend its reach to a wider international network of scholars". For further information, please contact Kate at K.A.Walchester@ljmu.ac.uk. The event is free, but interested parties need to register here. ...
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Teaching English in Thailand: Naomi Sykes

Teaching English in Thailand: Naomi Sykes

After a placement in Malta teaching English last year, arranged through LJMU's Erasmus office with the help of Jayne Kerwin, Level 6 English and Creative Writing student Naomi Sykes couldn't wait to work abroad again. And now, once all her assignments are handed in, she's off to Thailand to teach in Nakhon Ratchasima province. Naomi says: 'Jayne knew how much I thrived over there teaching English so she recommended applying for this placement in Thailand too. I had to send in an online application including a cover letter and a C.V and there was a very long waiting process for the verdict. It all seems so close now though, as I have booked my flights, sorted out my DBS check, the ball is rolling and the dream is becoming a reality! I will be 2/3 hours from Bangkok the capital which is perfect and I am super excited to do what I love and get some adventure in there too! I was thrilled to find...
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Research Seminar: Dr Fionualla Dillane, ‘New Old Formalism, Old New Historicism, Victorian Periodicals and the Problem of Genre’

Research Seminar: Dr Fionualla Dillane, ‘New Old Formalism, Old New Historicism, Victorian Periodicals and the Problem of Genre’

10th March, 2015. After a warm welcome to LJMU from Professor Brian Maidment, Dr Fionualla Dillane from University College Dublin outlined the crux of her discussion. Is the study of periodicals under threat from the ‘new old formalism’ that encourages the researcher to think of the periodical as a ‘training ground’ for writers approaching established forms. By broaching the muddy waters of genre using the return to formalism, genre, Fionualla suggested, is a methodological tool and a conceptual frame. The study of periodicals has always been interdisciplinary due to the diverse field and contents of periodicals. Fionualla unpacked the concept of new formalism, giving rich analysis of the pivotal texts and argued that a return to formalism privileges the literary, which, by extension, deprivileges other texts defined as lacking literary merit and designated as craft. This is a conservative approach which Fioualla successfully argued is ‘turning back’. Fionualla argued that the study of periodicals is still at the stage of description rather than...
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Collaboration and Collegiality at the Northern Postcolonial Network

Collaboration and Collegiality at the Northern Postcolonial Network

“The Northern Postcolonial Network Inaugural Event”, LJMU, Wednesday 25th March 2015 The Northern Postcolonial Network was established in 2014 by early career researchers at the universities of Manchester, Salford and Sheffield to support knowledge exchange among postcolonial researchers in the North of the UK. The inaugural event, organised by Dr Kate Houlden, LJMU, took place at LJMU on the 25th March and was the first time I would be speaking about my research since starting my PhD at LJMU in January. My nerves were dispelled as soon as the roundtable discussion about the aims of the network began. The discussion was led by founding members and organisers, who introduced key topics such as establishing a database of research, the pedagogical concerns of the network and community partnerships. The discussion evolved with contributions from network members and key questions were raised about the significance of a “Northern” postcolonial network and how to keep both local and global perspectives within our field of...
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The Judas Kiss: Treason and Betrayal in Six Modern Irish Novels

The Judas Kiss: Treason and Betrayal in Six Modern Irish Novels

Gerry Smyth's new book argues that modern Irish history encompasses a deep-seated fear of betrayal, and that this fear has been especially prevalent since the revolutionary period at the outset of the twentieth century. The author goes on to argue that the novel is the literary form most apt for the exploration of betrayal in its social, political and psychological dimensions. The significance of this thesis comes into focus in terms of a number of recent developments – most notably, the economic downturn (and the political and civic betrayals implicated therein) and revelations of the Catholic Church’s failure in its pastoral mission. As many observers note, such developments have brought the language of betrayal to the forefront of contemporary Irish life. This book offers a powerful analysis of modern Irish history as regarded from the perspective of some its most incisive minds, including James Joyce, Liam O’Flaherty, Elizabeth Bowen, Francis Stuart, Eugene McCabe and Anne Enright. ...
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Northern Postcolonial Network Has Its First Meeting At LJMU

Northern Postcolonial Network Has Its First Meeting At LJMU

The inaugural event of the research group the Northern Postcolonial Network will be taking place at LJMU this week, on Wednesday, 25th April 2015. Organised by LJMU English's Dr Kate Houlden, the day will involve a mixture of discussion about the aims and priorities of the network, a postgraduate panel, a keynote address from Professor John McLeod of Leeds University and an evening event featuring a reading by acclaimed Leeds poet Khadijah Ibrahiim. Other speakers include LJMU English PhD student Christina Hobbs, whose paper is entitled, ‘Comparing Independence in Literature of the Danish North Sea Empire: A Study in World Literature’. A full programme, and registration details for this free event, are available at: http://northernpostcolonialnetwork.com/events/...
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Did She Kill Him? A Talk With The Author

Did She Kill Him? A Talk With The Author

Kate Colquhoun’s novel Did She Kill Him?On Thursday 5th February esteemed author, lecturer and academic Kate Colquhoun graced Liverpool John Moore’s University with her presence to talk to intrigued students and staff members alike about her historical retelling of a Merseyside story, Did She Kill Him? In brief, Kate explores the interesting case of Florence Maybrick, who in 1889 was arrested and put on trial for the alleged murder of her cotton merchant husband, James Maybrick. Method? (Arsenic) Poison. Motive? Adultery. Florence, a sweet (?), innocent (?) and virtuous (?) Alabama girl is represented in Kate’s novel as being the victim of a malicious judicial system which callously singled out a naïve and fragile widower. Further, Kate suggests that Florence was systematically and categorically alienated, isolated and finally subjugated by a hostile and altogether unwelcoming (British) milieu which failed to adopt her. Further, the entrepreneur’s untimely demise was shrouded in mystery from the offset, captivating the intrigue of the British media,...
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Love’s Labours Lost: Live in Liverpool

Love’s Labours Lost: Live in Liverpool

On the 11th February 2015 a number of students attended a live streaming of Shakespeare’s Love’s Labours Lost in a Royal Shakespeare Company production coming to us in FACT Liverpool from Stratford-Upon-Avon. Set in an Edwardian country house, this was an excellent production of one of the lesser-known plays. The visit was arranged for Level 5 students taking the Shakespeare module but other students and postgraduates also came along. The play (and its comedy) really came to life although, sitting in a cinema, it was difficult to know whether or not to applaud along with the enthusiastic audience in Stratford! We did, however, have the advantage of taking in food and drink. Second-year student Andrew Stevens-Davies commented: ‘Having not attended a Shakespeare performance before, I did not know what to expect from a cinematic viewing of a live performance. That being said, my expectations were immediately surpassed. As an English student studying Shakespeare I quite often find myself getting frustrated with the...
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‘He heard the world more than he saw it’: Dr Gerry Smyth launches James Joyce’s Chamber Music Resource

‘He heard the world more than he saw it’: Dr Gerry Smyth launches James Joyce’s Chamber Music Resource

In 2011 Dr Gerry Smyth of LJMU English set to music the thirty-six lyrics that comprise Chamber Music, published by the Irish author James Joyce in 1907. Although Joyce is one of the most studied authors of the modern era, his poetry remains relatively unknown. The following year, Gerry recorded this material for a CD entitled James Joyce’s Chamber Music: New ‘Folkish’ Settings of the Thirty-Six Lyrics, and since then he has performed material from the album on numerous occasions, including events in Belgium, France, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden. During the same period, Dr Smyth commenced work on a web-based learning resource, hosted by LJMU, which features a wide range of textual and video materials relating to Joyce’s original collection, and to the new musical version. This is an on-going project which will in time be fully integrated into LJMU English's teaching and research profile, and you can access it here, and via the 'Links and Resources' section of our site. The website was launched at an event in...
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LJMU English Hosts Inaugural Event of the Northern Postcolonial Network

LJMU English Hosts Inaugural Event of the Northern Postcolonial Network

Members of the Northern Postcolonial Network (founded by the Universities of Sheffield, Salford and Manchester) are pleased to announce the network's inaugural event will take place on Wednesday 25th March at Liverpool John Moores University, 1-8pm. The network aims to support knowledge exchange and networking amongst scholars and other individuals and groups working on postcolonial topics in the North of the UK. The day itself will involve a mixture of discussion about the aims and priorities of the network, a postgraduate panel, a keynote address from Professor John McLeod of Leeds University and an evening event. We would welcome attendees from diverse contexts and fields, so as to further the discussion about postcolonial studies in the region. Further details to follow including a CFP for postgraduate papers. Please contact Dr. Kate Houlden on k.m.houlden@ljmu.ac.uk for further information or see the website at http://northernpostcolonialnetwork.com/. Alternatively, follow us on www.facebook.com/northernpostcolonialnetwork or on Twitter at @Northernpoco....
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REF 2014: Our Results

REF 2014: Our Results

English at LJMU is delighted with its performance in the Research Excellence Framework exercise 2014. In this national audit of research quality, 68% of our work was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent. Within the University, English is now the third strongest area in research activity and 5th for the subject in the North West. We are ranked 38th out of 74 institutions in England for the subject. LJMU has also moved up 19 places in research quality ranking, from 81st in the UK in RAE 2008 to 62nd for REF 2014 (THES). Professor Glenda Norquay, REF Co-ordinator for English, commented: ‘We are very pleased with this result. We have significantly moved up the league tables for our subject and as a university and are delighted with this external recognition of the exciting scholarship that takes place at LJMU. The fact that 50% of our ‘impact’ was awarded a ‘world-leading’ rating also indicates the reach of our engagement with a...
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The New Academic

The New Academic

LJMU English’s Nadine Muller has an incredibly busy and informative website all of her own. Drawing together her own teaching, publications, and research activities, and providing advice and debate for those entering the lecturing profession in The New Academic, it offers a wealth of resources for academics and students alike. ...
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James Joyce’s Chamber Music

James Joyce’s Chamber Music

LJMU English’s Gerry Smyth is also a musician. In 2012 he recorded and released an album entitled James Joyce’s Chamber Music: this was a folk musical version (co-written and performed with his daughter) of the thirty-six lyric suite published by James Joyce in 1907. Music played a crucial role in Joyce’s literary imagination, and Gerry has gathered together a wealth of material on this aspect of Joyce’s creative process, including the notation and performance of Joyce’s songs. You can explore this amazing resource here. ...
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Writing Lives

Writing Lives

Writing Lives is a final-year undergraduate module on the LJMU English programmes, taught by Helen Rogers. Autobiographies are one of the most important resources we have for learning about the experiences and identities of ordinary – and extraordinary – people in the past. Memoirs have also been one of the most common forms of writing undertaken by working-class authors but many memoirs are never published and few remain in print. The aim of the Writing Lives Blog is to make some of this literature publicly available and to explore its significance for understanding working-class culture and identity. ...
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Social Media Skills for Students

Social Media Skills for Students

Social Media Skills for Students is an LJMU English project which builds on Nadine Muller’s work-experience module ‘Express Yourself: Presentation and Social Media Skills’ by creating a resource that extends beyond the English undergraduate programme at LJMU and that is accessible and useful to all students within and outside the university. Through this dedicated website, students are able to draw on guides and exercises devised to maximize their digital literacy and provide them with a professional online presence that can function as a significant aid in their career development and prospects. The site was established and developed by Nadine and her team of amazing interns. ...
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Prison Voices

Prison Voices

Prison Voices: Crime, Conviction and Confession, 1700-1900 is created by second-year undergraduates studying English literature and cultural history at Liverpool John Moores University, UK. In our blogs we examine the literature of crime and punishment in the 18th and 19th centuries, both fictional and non-fictional, and consider how these influenced each other. ...
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LJMU English on TV

LJMU English on TV

Tune into Liverpool's Bay TV (Freeview Channel 8) tonight (Wednesday 17th December) to see highlights from one of LJMU English's Shelf Lives events at the magnificent Central Library. Members of the team talk about some of the books in the Library's holdings that fascinate them and have inspired their research. Watch out for more Shelf Lives events (and Bay TV book-related programmes) in 2015. You can visit Bay TV's website here: http://www.baytvliverpool.com  ...
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Shelf Lives, Liverpool Central Library, 10th December 2014

Shelf Lives, Liverpool Central Library, 10th December 2014

The final 'Shelf Lives' event of 2014 ran at Liverpool's Central Library on 10th December. In these sessions, three members of staff from LJMU English talk about books from the Library's holdings that have particularly inspired them. This usually results in an eclectic mix of literary material and discussion topics, and this event was no exception. James Whitehead talked about his fascination with the slippery double narrative of James Hogg’s Confessions of a Justified Sinner (1824). Jo Croft introduced many of the audience to the work of Denton Welch, a novelist, poet and painter, through the posthumously published  A Last Sheaf (1951), discussing his life, writing and poetry. Finally, Ross Dawson discussed the complex politics and irascible humour of the first volume of Alexei Sayle’s autobiography Stalin Ate My Homework (2010). Shelf Lives will continue in the New Year - please keep an eye on both this website and that of the Central Library for details. Everyone is very welcome....
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Level 4 Field Trip: Brontë Parsonage, 22 October 2014

Level 4 Field Trip: Brontë Parsonage, 22 October 2014

'The reader is shocked, disgusted, almost sickened by details of cruelty, inhumanity, and the most diabolical hate and vengeance, and anon come passages of powerful testimony to the supreme power of love—even over demons in the human form.' So ran the review of Ellis Bell's Wuthering Heights in Douglas Jerrold's Weekly Newspaper in 1848, and Emily Brontë, the novel's real author, clipped out that review and kept it in her desk until her death only months later.  On 22 October 2014 students and staff from our first-year core module Reading English were able to see that desk (and even the sofa on which she died) on a suitably wind-swept visit to the Brontë Parsonage Museum, in Haworth, West Yorkshire. Here, Level 4 students Megan Bagnall and Jessica Blain describe their trip: The Brontë Parsonage Museum, Haworth: arguably the capitol of Brontë country in West Yorkshire. After travelling by coach, rather than horse and carriage, we arrived at our destination for an afternoon of education, enlightenment...
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Conference: Women Writing Pleasure, 3 July 2015

Conference: Women Writing Pleasure, 3 July 2015

We are thrilled to announce that LJMU English will be hosting a one-day conference on "Women Writing Pleasure" on 3 July 2015. Focusing on all genres of women's writing from the nineteenth century through to the present day, the event will facilitate discussion on the numerous ways in which women writers have conceptualised, described, and engaged with various forms of pleasure, from the intellectual to the sexual, from the material to the psychological, and beyond. The conference is co-organised by PhD researchers Chloe Holland and Krystina Osborne and by Dr Nadine Muller. To read the call for papers, download the conference poster, and more information about the event, please visit the dedicated conference website at http://www.womenwritingpleasure.com....
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Dr Jon Cranfield and the Holmesian Phenomenon

Dr Jon Cranfield and the Holmesian Phenomenon

Jon Cranfield's new book, co-edited with Tom Ue, received an excellent review in the Guardian this week. Sherlock Holmes is part of a series called Fan Phenomena which explores how enduring cultural icons are continually reinvented by their fans. The essays cover a wide range of these creative reinterpretations, from Steampunk iPad apps to Shakespeare and including, of course, the most recent television reappearance, played by Benedict Cumberbatch. Jon's own chapter in the book is entitled 'Sherlock Holmes: Fan Culture and Fan Letters'. Look out for a copy arriving soon in the Aldham Robarts Library....
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LJMU English Help Set Up Northern Postcolonial Network

LJMU English Help Set Up Northern Postcolonial Network

Kate Houlden from LJMU English has been integral in bringing the department into collaboration with a range of new colleagues across the North of England (from Salford, Sheffield and Manchester Universities). Working with Michael Morris and Fiona Tolan, she is part of the newly established Northern Postcolonial Network, which aims to support knowledge exchange and networking amongst scholars and other individuals and groups in the field. LJMU will be hosting the network’s inaugural event in the Spring of 2015, with an exciting programme to follow. Kate says ‘We’re very pleased to be working with these partner institutions. Such collaboration will allow us to engage with key questions in postcolonial studies, benefitting staff and students alike. For more information, please visit the group's website, or follow them on Facebook or Twitter.  ...
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Shelf Lives: Wednesday, 15 October 2014

Shelf Lives: Wednesday, 15 October 2014

LJMU English will be running the next in the series of Shelf Lives talks on the top floor of Liverpool City Library on Wednesday 15th October 2014, from 3PM to 4.30PM. Jon Cranfield will talk about Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902), followed by Deaglán Ó Donghaile on Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent (1907), and Elspeth Graham on Izaak Walton's The Compleat Angler (1653). We hope to see you there.! ...
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This conference changed my life (or my thesis, at least)

This conference changed my life (or my thesis, at least)

I recently got back from a four day geekend that was an international conference on science fiction held in London, as the 72nd WorldCon, an event so big that countries and cities bid for it in coming years (like the Olympics, but instead of athletes you get nerds) – indeed, it was held in a venue so big that it had two – TWO – train stations. Count them… Two. The conference was on diversity in science fiction, from its conception and inception to form and content, including text and hypertext, passive and interactive narratives, and, specifically for me, narratives that operated outside of the dominant paradigm of the straight white male. As I was struggling with a dissertation on the (feminist) posthuman in Iain M Banks novels, Alice Ferrebe threw over a CFP email and I went for it with all the verve and vitriol I had. And they accepted my abstract. And then I panicked. But I had my mentors, the staff,...
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How We Used To Live: LJMU English Hosts Northern Film Premiere

How We Used To Live: LJMU English Hosts Northern Film Premiere

First shown at the 2013 London Film Festival, How We Used To Live is a poetic collage-history of London, setting colour footage from the BFI National Archive to the hazy, beautiful music of Saint Etienne. Produced by the filmmaking collective of the band with writer Travis Elborough and director Paul Kelly, it looks back at Britain from the 1950s to the 1980s, with some scenes lost to contemporary Britain, but some still profoundly resonant. The film will be screened on Thursday, 14th October 2014 at 5.30pm in John Foster 121, and Travis Elborough will answer questions afterwards. You can watch a trailer of the film here. ...
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Alice Ferrebe, Literature of the 1950s: Good Brave Causes

Alice Ferrebe, Literature of the 1950s: Good Brave Causes

Alice Ferrebe's study rereads the decade and its literature as crucial in twentieth-century British history for its emergent and increasingly complicated politics of difference, as ideas about identity, authority and belonging were tested and contested. By placing a diverse selection of texts alongside those of the established canon of Movement and 'Angry' writing, a literary culture of true diversity and depth is brought into view. The volume characterises the 1950s as a time of confrontation with a range of concerns still avidly debated today, including immigration, education, the challenging behaviour of youth, nuclear threat, the post-industrial and post-imperial legacy, a consumerist economy and a feminist movement hampered by the perceivedly comprehensive nature of its recent success. Contrary to Jimmy Porter's defeatist judgement on his era in John Osborne's 1956 play Look Back in Anger, the volume upholds such concerns as 'good, brave causes' indeed. Literature of the 1950s: Good Brave Causes was published by Edinburgh University Press in 2012....
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Joe Moran, Armchair Nation

Joe Moran, Armchair Nation

'But what does your furniture point at?' asks the character Joey in the sitcom Friends, on hearing an acquaintance has no TV. It's a good question: since its beginnings during WW2, television has assumed a central role in our houses and our lives, just as satellite dishes and aerials have become features of urban skylines. Television (or 'the idiot's lantern', depending on your feelings about it) has created controversy, brought coronations and World Cups into living rooms, allowed us access to 24hr news and media and provided a thousand conversation starters. As shows come and go in popularity, the history of television shows us how our society has changed. Joe Moran's Armchair Nation: An Intimate History of Britain in Front of the TV reveals the fascinating, lyrical and sometimes surprising history of telly, from the first demonstration of television by John Logie Baird (in Selfridges) to the fear and excitement that greeted its arrival in households (some viewers worried it might control their...
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Postfeminism & Contemporary Hollywood Cinema

Postfeminism & Contemporary Hollywood Cinema

Much ground has been covered in terms of (post)feminist analyses of popular film and television, and box office successes such as Bridget Jones's Diary and television phenomena such as Sex and the City have become established parts of the now canonical critical texts on postfeminism, media and popular culture. By analyzing the negotiation of femininities and masculinities within contemporary Hollywood cinema, by charting trends in film production and media reception, and by focusing on the largely neglected intersections between postfeminism and queer theory,Postfeminism and Contemporary Hollywood Cinema presents diverse interrogations of popular cinema. The chapters in this collection position contemporary commercial production as a space where female empowerment is both celebrated and undermined, and signal the necessity of further debate surrounding the formation of gender identity in postmillennial Hollywood cinema. You can purchase print and electronic copies of this publication and find out more about the contributions collected in it here....
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