Welcome Freshers 2016!

Welcome Freshers 2016!

Welcome to LJMU English! This tab along with the T.E.A tab are your first stops for all the information you'll need for your first few weeks. Beyond Freshers, us lot over at T.E.A (check out our actual faces under 'Student Interns' down the side there ----->) will be providing you with lots of helpful tips and insights into studying at LJMU. To get you started here's some very helpful stuff: Induction Week:     The Blackboard Community Site is where all of your course-related info and induction timetables will appear, and you'll receive details of how to gain access when you receive your official Welcome Pack from the University towards the end of August. Don't worry if you are struggling to understand Blackboard, we all are, it's a complicated beast and you will soon be able to just about tolerate it (that's as good as it gets with Blackboard, sorry). Once you are an enrolled, inducted, official LJMU student we can tell you all our deepest, darkest secrets (probably). By then you will undoubtedly...
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Welcome to T.E.A.

Welcome to T.E.A.

Hello and welcome to the official page of The English Appendage - or T.E.A. for short! We are a group of third year students here to help you with the transition to university. As our name suggests, we are an "appendage" to the English department and will be working alongside them to ensure that your first year goes as smoothly as possible, although we can't guarantee that there won't be a few bumps! We can offer that bit of extra help with the initial stress of getting your brain back into gear as getting started in university can be a bit full on. Whether you've come straight from sixth form, taken a year out to find yourself or have spent numerous years using your brain for literally anything else! We will be active on Twitter, Facebook, and right here posting academic hints and tips about numerous topics about how to get started on your reading and writing and how to survive university whilst...
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An Introduction to World, Time and Text

An Introduction to World, Time and Text

World, Time and Text is an expansive module, incorporating texts from across the centuries so you are bound to enjoy something and if not everything. You'll be exposed to such a plethora of literature that you're at least learning a lesson in diversifying from your normal reading list. Starting with Paradise Lost you're dropped somewhere near the deep end but fear not, we've already compiled a list of hints and tips with how best to stay afloat and enjoy the epic poetry of John Milton! World, Time and Text focuses on intertextuality, how literature across generations is linked and what questions this brings about authorship. What you learn about intertextuality in this module will be applicable for all modules across the course and brings about all sorts of debates about who retains the authority on a piece of writing. From Paradise Lost you will look at Northern Lights by Phillip Pullman, edging towards the shallow end, unfortunately filled with a talking polar bear refusing to give up any...
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Paradise Lost by John Milton

Paradise Lost by John Milton

Paradise Lost: As an opening text to studying English at University, Paradise Lost by John Milton can seem a daunting prospect for a few reasons. It is an epic poem about Satan post-fall from Heaven and the fall of Man, as soon as you open it you'll see why it can get tricky. Here are a few tips to get you started: It will be the first book you study for World, Time and Text, so make sure you read Book 1 as early as possible! It is important to get a head start, especially because the chances are you will need to read it about five times before you feel like you are beginning to understand it. Try reading it aloud: The problem with big words and long sentences is that the brain can begin to trip over itself a tad. Reading Paradise Lost to yourself aloud (In the biblical style of an early 90s Samuel. L. Jackson) will give you a sense of rhythm to the epic poem, and help with your...
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Reading English Module.

Reading English Module.

This is quite a fast-paced module, structured in three parts - focussing in turn on poetry (including 'V' by Tony Harrison - amazing, and Shakespeare's Sonnets), prose (Wuthering Heights - see T.E.A's separate post for this) and drama (Endgame by Samuel Beckett). This module, for me, felt quite different from the others, due to the varied material. Kate Walchester says: "The aim of 'Reading English' is to ease your transition into the undergraduate study of English Literature by introducing you to a wide range of texts from different periods, refreshing your knowledge of literary terms and techniques, and supporting you as you write your first research essay". This module may feel like a bit of a rollercoaster, unnerving at times, but it is exactly because of this feeling that the module is so enjoyable. It allows you the opportunity to explore the variations in literature. When it comes to choosing your modules for level 5, you will have a good idea of the different areas of study - for...
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Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

This is one of the texts you will study on the Reading English module. First of all let me just say that this novel is NOT a typical 'chick love story' (as one person put it in my seminar group). Heathcliff is far from the romantic hero, if he can be considered that at all! This is a far more complex story about greed, class, conflict and consequences. Please do not assume that you can watch a TV or film adaptation and know the story. The novel is far more complex, with intricately woven plot and character relationships. These things are never, in my opinion, portrayed correctly on screen and the novel's gothic atmosphere is usually either overlooked or over-done. I admit that Wuthering Heights is sometimes difficult to get into, I had to go back and start again, as I found I had not taken in the first few chapters, but perseverance with this novel is rewarding. There is so...
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American Classics Module

American Classics Module

This module will introduce you to American literature and ask you to consider its wider significance in American culture. As the title would suggest the idea of the literary classic plays a key part but rather than simply accept that some texts are 'classics' and others aren't, the module prompts you to consider what it is that makes a classic. What social and cultural ideas get reinforced when certain texts are named classics? The first text you'll read is Solomon Northup's 1853 text Twelve Years a Slave.  Two tips here: 1) don't think you'll be able to get away with just watching the film! and 2) buy the (cheap) Wordsworth Edition of the text which includes module leader Dr Colin Harrison's introduction to the text. Studying a slave narrative to begin a module on American literature will kick off all of those discussions about classics, how, for example, does American literary history change if considered amongst its most important works are...
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Literature in Context

Literature in Context

This module aims to introduce you to methods of critical and contextual reading central to the English programme, and to the range of core skills essential to successful study at university level: at least that's the fancy way of explaining the module. Over the duration of the module you will analyse and compare literature from the 1950s and look at the cultural history of a novel, (it may sound boring but you will probably enjoy it, which is okay!). You will also be looking at how the novel was influenced by what was going on at the time. The pace of the module is set by the short story ‘The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner’ which is what your first assignment is on, but don't worry too much: it's only 600 words (the assignment, not the story). The texts that follow from the 1950s are Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes, Sam Selvon's The Lonely Londoners and Shelagh Delaney's A Taste of Honey...
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The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

'The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner' by Alan Sillitoe: As the first text you’ll study for Literature in Context you will read this short story of a young working class man and his journey, both literally and metaphorically. The book raises questions about the class system, dialect and questioning our idea of morality. Here are some hints and tips as to how to best approach this short story: It is provided in the module booklet: Hurrah, save 60p from Amazon Market Place  and spend it on toast in the morning. Any freebies (I say freebies, £9000, but who’s splitting hairs?) like this are made for highlighting and underlining, go nuts in the lecture by scrawling notes over it to help you with writing your first essay in Literature in Context. It will be the first piece you have to write about at University: Despite being an introductory essay of 600 words there will be a ripple of fear through the room at the prospect...
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Digital Victorians Module

Digital Victorians Module

This is a new module running in the second semester (2017). Unfortunately I cannot restart my degree to take this module, or add it on to my modules for level 6! Not only does it look amazing but unbelievably helpful in introducing you to research skills early on in your degree. You will have the chance to research through digital sources whilst using social media and 'hands on' blogging to explore the past. If you plan to start reading for this module early, it is best to start with Sydney Padua's The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the Frist Computer. I have already added this to my 'for fun' reading list too! You will also look at Charles Dickens' Great Expectations.  This will be read on the module in its intended serial form (with week by week analysis), so you do not need to read this in advance (obviously you can, if you like). In this...
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Literary and Cultural Theory

Literary and Cultural Theory

This module will introduce you to the main areas of literary and cultural theory and teach you how to apply them to literary texts as well as teaching you to think critically about just about everything: films, TV, current events, family dinners, you think of it and by the end of this module you'll be able to crticially analyse it. You'll learn about Psychoanalysis, Marxism, Postcolonial Theory, and Feminism. You'll have two sessions on each approach, which will mean you'll get to grips with the main concepts of the theory, and then work on applying them 'in practice'. The assessment for this module is in two parts, a presentation and an essay. For the presentation you'll be asked to prepare, in small groups, about 10 minutes on one of the theories, demonstrating how you would apply it to a text, film, music video, song, etc, of your choice. For example, you might do a feminist reading of a Shakespeare play, or take a...
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Being a Commuting Student

Being a Commuting Student

Commuting to uni can sometimes be a challenge, especially if you live a bit of a distance away, and have a 9am lecture. It’s not rocket science – you have to get up early. However, you really need to make sure you give yourself enough time to eat and drink first. There is nothing worse than sitting in a lecture and your stomach rumbling! Thankfully if you are in a rush there is The Amazing Georgina – the toast lady in the student zone, who makes the best tea and toast ever . You will also need to get yourself sorted out with a train or bus pass. On a more personal note: It can be a worry that because you're not living in halls you won't meet people. This is not the case, there are ways you can get involved through the LSU, different societies you may be interested in and so on. The LSU have a lot of social events taking...
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Being a Working Student

Being a Working Student

So, the day has finally come, you've got your start date for uni, your first timetable, you're feeling like a giddy 12 year old once again and then it dawns on you... how on Earth am I going to juggle University and a job? The answer: it's actually a lot easier than you may first think. Since I was sixteen, I have had a part time job working for a supermarket chain (legally, I'm not allowed to tell you which one sorry!) and the thought of losing my monthly pay check is just not a welcome one. Regardless of the fact that you're about to get a student loan, there is still that niggling voice at the back of your head saying that you need the extra money and the truth is, it is nice to have it. Even though I could afford to give up my job and live off of my loan, I don't want to. I enjoy knowing...
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Being a Mature Student

Being a Mature Student

I came to university after completing an Access course at college. I had done my A-Levels when I was younger, at which time I decided to take a year out to save money before university. That year turned into many as life took over and bills had to be paid. Many people have asked me, since returning to education, whether I regret not going to uni when I was younger. I can honestly say that I don’t. At 18 years old I was not confident or assertive in anyway, I was not sure what I wanted to do and certainly not prepared for the amount of work involved in university life – if you want to put your all into it. As a mature student I am not distracted by the nightlife (I did all of that in my 20’s) although I do enjoy meals out in Liverpool's many fantastic restaurants! I’m more aware of why I am here (at...
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Being a Student Parent

Being a Student Parent

I dropped out of university when I was 20 and moved back home to have my son. I knew it was the best option because my student life at the time consisted of getting up for a 9am lecture, pouring myself a mug of wine, and going back to bed until it was time to hit the clubs of Lancaster again (there are clubs in Lancaster, honest). Needless to say, becoming a parent changed my schedule a fair bit. For a while I was content with having  swapped booze for a balanced diet and night life for, well - still night life - but of a different sort. Then I started to wonder if I'd ever be able to go back to university. I wanted to, but I had a lot of doubts. Sometimes making it through the day without putting the telephone in the dishwasher or the kettle in the fridge seems like the greatest thing you'll ever achieve as a parent. It's a...
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Helpful Links From The World Wide Web

Helpful Links From The World Wide Web

As the results day draws to a close, we are inevitably overcome with an oversaturation of 'What to expect as a student' 'Top 10 things students say', 'Why you should/shouldn't go to university' articles from various media outlets. As a fresh, newly established organisation we are surely above such condescending trivialities? Sort of, what we've done is put together some of the more helpful links to sites with an abundance of interesting articles. Quite a lot of my own worry before starting University was that everybody kept on asking me if I was worried. Everybody is different with how they approach starting a new journey and there is no sense in worrying about not worrying, which sounds ridiculous, but is one of those perpetual cycles created by Sixth form and colleges so you think everything is getting incredibly grown up. Some of what you'll read or be told by those you know may hit the nail on the head and help...
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Liverpool For Literature Lovers

Liverpool For Literature Lovers

If you can manage to put down your books and get out of bed every now and again, there is a lot for a literature lover to do in this here Liverpool. Here are some good things: The Bluecoat: Located here, The Bluecoat is the city's hotspot for contemporary arts of all kinds. If you check out their events page and tick 'Literature' it will bring up a list of exciting literary happenings. Often they are free, or charge a very small fee. If you are a poetry fan like me then look out for their (usually free) poetry readings and groups. If you are in Liverpool this month then there is an exciting sounding Literary Walks event called Visiting Victorians on Sunday 24th July, 2-4pm. The event "evokes 19th century Liverpool and discovers how writers explored the struggles and triumphs of the town that Dickens called the ‘Copperfield stronghold'"- click the link to book tickets. The events are updated every few weeks so keep checking back to see what's on. There is...
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Feeling daunted? Ineffectual? Inadequate? Don’t panic it’s all fine!

Feeling daunted? Ineffectual? Inadequate? Don’t panic it’s all fine!

My first two weeks at uni were spent walking aimlessly round, lost most of the time and hoping I could find someone I could follow - obviously not in a weird stalker way. I think everyone feels a little out of their depth at times, and you're not alone if you do, it's a common feeling. There have been moments when I have asked myself if I chose the right course, whether I was good enough to be on the course and generally whether I would do well. The truth is you're here on your own merit, you've earned your place: so you are in the right place. Self-doubt is something you simply have to get over in your own time. If you receive a mark on your assignment that you're disappointed with don't be disheartened, the tutors give constructive feedback that you can take on board and use to improve your work next time. The tutors are always happy to talk through...
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Student Discount

Student Discount

This is possibly the best thing about being a student (other than gaining a degree), as saving money is a student's prerogative. All you need is a bit of plastic, otherwise known as an LJMU card or NUS card, and you will be saving money here, there and everywhere! Getting your student discount in shops is fairly simple as you present your LJMU student card when you pay and you get 10% off your purchase, simple right? However, as you may notice on your new shiny LJMU card, there is no expiry date which means some shops may not accept it for student discount. Do not worry, we are here to help and have some inside information just for you... LJMU is a great university (as you know because you've chosen to go here) but you probably didn't know they are so great that they can get you a free NUS card, yes FREE! You apply for the card online...
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How To Dress and Accessorise Like A Literature Student: Our ESSENTIAL Picks

How To Dress and Accessorise Like A Literature Student: Our ESSENTIAL Picks

‘No, I haven’t done the reading for this week’ t-shirt. Dark sunglasses for avoiding eye contact with tutors in seminars when you haven’t done the reading for that week. Knitwear. Lots of knitwear. Chunky knits with pockets big enough to put books in. Fancy bookmarks. If you turn up to uni with sub-par bookmarks you’ll regret it for the rest of your life. This is the big leagues. A large, practical bag. Fashion has no place here, OK? You’ll probably always need to carry at least 15 books at any given time….. Lots of pendant necklaces with literary quotes on them. Everyone’s wearing ‘em. Anything you can find that has a literary quote on it. Just go mad and cover yourself in words, this is who you are now. A pile of books to arrange by your side at all times: 1 dog-eared and very stained to prove you love the classics like a proper literature student, 1 annotated...
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Eating Your Reading List

Eating Your Reading List

Everyone loves a bowl of plain pasta and a pot noodle butty, but a few decent meals here and there can make a huge difference to your life, let alone your ability to study. There’s tons of food advice for students around, but can you use the books on your reading list as a cooking aids? Yes: yes you can. How much fun would it be to eat along with your favourite characters? (The answer is: SO MUCH FUN!) Here’s what culinary delights some of your first year texts have to offer, along with helpful links to simple recipes from the World Wide Web: Wuthering Heights fans can treat themselves to ‘boiled milk or tea’ and a delicious ‘basin of milk porridge’. If you’re feeling very hungry try ‘a plateful of cakes’. Hopefully your accommodation doesn’t make you feel like you’re living on the set of A Taste of Honey, but some ‘biscuits and a flask of coffee’ may brighten your early...
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Erasmus Opportunities: Naples, anyone?

Erasmus Opportunities: Naples, anyone?

Dr Filippo Menozzi, our (Italian) English lecturer, has been working to establish a new Erasmus opportunity for future students on the programme (like you, if you're a Fresher in 2016!). This will allow future level 5 students (who enter their second year from 2017/2018 onwards) the chance to spend a term studying in Naples at the University of Naples L'Orientale! I'm so jealous I almost don't want to write this post... The programme (in Naples! Did I mention that?) will be taught in English and you will choose modules from their existing English literature programme. You will be assessed by them, which will obviously go toward your degree in England (unfortunately you will have to return). The assessment styles may differ slightly from those at home, but this will be clarified before you go. As students you will receive help with regard to your accommodation and travel plans, and you'll receive plenty of other information to help you whilst you're there. This opportunity will enable students to...
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Reading Is Good For You

Reading Is Good For You

"Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing." - Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird. We all have our own stories of how we became readers, whether you were introduced to reading as a child, or came to it of your own free will. The most important thing is that you found books, or did they find you? I have always felt a need to read and have always been surrounded by books. I was always read to as a child, and I can still remember the first book I bought with my own money, Roald Dahl's The Witches. It was not just the ability to disappear into other lands, and to partake in adventures, but something far more intrinsic to my general being. I always have a book on the go and I always have anthologies of poems around me, so that I can pick something up and put it down...
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Your Massive Reading List

Your Massive Reading List

Have you read the book for this week? Have you? Have you read all of the books IN THE WORLD? Because you need to - immediately! You are an English student now and the most important thing about being an English student is making sure that you never do anything other than read, read, read, and read some more. If you haven’t read and made extensive notes on every text on your reading list before the first week of teaching then you have already failed your degree and might as well throw the lot of them in the Mersey right now. Or maybe that’s not true. Maybe everything will be alright. Maybe you don’t need to read anything at all. Just sit back, make a cuppa, and spend the next 72 hours watching Netflix. Or maybe, just maybe, we can find a healthy and reasonable balance here. Getting to grips with the amount of reading you are required to do at degree...
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Film/TV Adaptations.

Film/TV Adaptations.

I have mentioned in my Wuthering Heights post that it is not good to rely on the film or TV version of a book. I stand by this. Reading the book is essential. Films and TV just don't have the time or the scope to convey everything that a book can. I'm sure you already know this as you've chosen English, but it's surprising how many students will try to dodge the reading. During group work on Lolita I was amazed to find that I'd missed a whole scene in the book, as had four others in my group. Whilst one student talked very excitedly about the significance of the scene the rest of us looked at each other, puzzled. The question was then asked, "Where in the book is that?" The student looked sheepish, "I've not read the book, I watched the film" (Groan!). But if you avoid this potential shame, watching a film or TV version can be...
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Worried? Afraid? Made the Wrong Choice?

Worried? Afraid? Made the Wrong Choice?

Now that a few weeks have passed, you're probably fed up of being told to read books. You might even be feeling daunted by the amount of books you have to get through, but the best way to deal with this is simple, just take it one book at a time. The tutors aren't (just) trying to torture you, you DO have to read the books to pass. Remember, you chose English as your degree, so just suck it up. If you're thinking 'OMG I chose the wrong course', and the thought of turning another page fills you with dread, then you probably did. All is not lost - you can probably still change it - but you need to do this ASAP so you don't fall too far behind. If you genuinely want to change courses, go and see your Personal Tutor to sort it straight away. There's no point hanging about and thinking it'll all just work out: be...
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Seminar Survival

Seminar Survival

If you are a good student (and I know you are) then you'll have read your English Style Guide from cover to cover at least five times and will be very familiar with the section titled: 'Seminars and What to Do in Them'. If you haven't read it (Shock! Horror!), then go and read it now because it is very helpful and tells you everything you need to know about what to do in seminars. That said, I’m sure you want to know even more about what to do in seminars, which is why I’ve written even more about what to do in seminars. Being in a seminar is just like being at a house party, but you have to navigate it completely sober. That may sound awful, but at this party, learning is your drink of choice (stay with me), and if you take it one sip at a time your inhibitions will fade and you’ll soon be the life...
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This Is How We Do It: Recipes

This Is How We Do It: Recipes

Whether you're living at home or living in halls it is important to eat well. It's not only good for the body but for the brain too. I know it can be difficult after a long day to go home and cook, and I also know it's far more pleasing at the time to have an extra hour in bed than get up and prepare a breakfast and lunch. I even know how hard it can be to live on a student budget, so here are some helpful recipes (hopefully). You can't live off coffee and alcohol, but we have thrown in some handy cocktail recipes for the weekend, just in case you need them! Lynne's Easy Tuna Pasta: Great for lunch. Ingredients: 2 - 3 tsp Green Pesto, 1 - 2 tbsp mayonnaise, tin of tuna (drained), diced cucumber (approximately a quarter of the cucumber), pepper and tomato (as much as you fancy), a bit of grated cheese, chopped jalapeños (Home Bargains sell these in...
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The Independent Scene: Food and Drink pt.1

The Independent Scene: Food and Drink pt.1

As the only non-North West based member of T.E.A (Midlands, not Southern), I would like to share some of my new found Liverpool knowledge with all and sundry. Since I moved to God's city, despite there already being a wealth of trendy and delicious treats on offer, it seems a new place opens up every week. My only issue with this is that despite trying my best, I cannot afford to get everywhere to sample everything, though not for lack of trying. Integral to my and many others' enjoyment of all the delights Liverpool has to offer is 'Independent Liverpool', a mysterious group or entity hell bent on destroying our need to ever leave the city. 'Independent Liverpool' offer a card (£15 for one, £20 for two, buy one for your mother) that helps with your wallet, and a website http://independent-liverpool.co.uk/ that constantly updates you on how best to enjoy Liverpool without resorting to a Costa and a pre-packaged Sainsburys sandwich. Not only does...
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The Independent Scene: Food and Drink pt. 2

The Independent Scene: Food and Drink pt. 2

I am predominantly vegetarian although I am actually a pescatarian. So, I am writing part two of where is good to eat and drink from a slightly different perspective. Liverpool has so many great places to eat and drink it's hard to choose, thus I am breaking them down a little... My Favourites Breakfast/Brunch: My favourite has got to be Moose Coffee. Situated on Dale Street, it's not too far to walk but far enough from the John Foster building to work up a bit of an appetite: you'll need it as the portions aren't stingy. The New Jersey Moose is my personal fave. It is a plateful of amazing flavour-packed potato hash and oozing runny eggs. They do a wide range of breakfasts, sandwiches, pancakes and waffles. There are a lot of veggie options and you can add extras like smoked salmon and bacon. Be sure to get there with plenty of time to spare though, this place gets full very quick! Dinner/Lunch (depending where you're from):...
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Plagiarism: A Guide

Plagiarism: A Guide

During your university career you will on plenty of occasions be reminded what a terrible thing it is to commit so-called 'Academic Misconduct'. These warnings may seem dramatic, your tutor may even include pictures of skulls in their powerpoint presentation in a desperate attempt to deter you, but there is a point to all of this. That point being: plagiarism is a bad idea, don't do it. Your English Style Guide tells you, 'The University defines Academic Misconduct as 'any case of deliberate, premeditated cheating, collusion, plagiarism or falsification of information, in an attempt to deceive and gain an unfair advantage in assessment''. And here are a couple of basic tips to help you on your merry way to not being dragged to trial in Cheater's Court (you actually will have to go to a panel hearing if you plagiarise, beware!): Learn to Reference: Have your English Style Guide beside you every time you start an assignment. Read it, love it, learn its...
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The Library is Your Friend

The Library is Your Friend

The library really is your friend but like all friends you need to give it love and attention. It's just like that one friend you have who is clever and beautiful but also like, totally deep and complicated and if you don't make an effort to really understand, they'll walk off in a huff and hide the books you need. We all have a friend like that right? So here's some top tips about hanging out with your new mate and getting what you need. FINDING BOOKS WHEN YOU KNOW EXACTLY WHAT YOU WANT: This always seems like it's going to be so easy but we've all found ourselves wandering aimlessly up and down the aisles on the verge of tears because the book you need should be RIGHT HERE but it's not and it's all a conspiracy against you and you alone. The library services home page (https://www2.ljmu.ac.uk/lea/index.asp) is the starting point for all my tips so acquaint yourself with it now. Click 'Search Library Catalogue' under Quick...
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The Library Archives

The Library Archives

By now you will probably be experts in using the library (if not you can consult our helpful post and/or get in touch with the nice library folk), but have you ever used the archives in Aldham Robarts? Perhaps you have heard talk of The Lower Ground Floor and wondered what happens down there...? Well, wonder no more for the mysteries of LG are about to be revealed. If you look up the Archives and Special Collections on the LJMU website you can find out about their impressive and exciting collections. If you have an interest in researching something particular that's the place to look. You can find all the information regarding when you can visit and who you should contact via that website. If you get in touch with them, I can guarantee you will be welcomed by someone lovely, knowledgeable, and very willing to help. There is a lot of really exciting stuff down there, from the Willy Russell Archive to The Punch...
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LJMU at SCSU: English Students Join Trip to Southern Connecticut State University

LJMU at SCSU: English Students Join Trip to Southern Connecticut State University

LJMU English students Ryan Pickering and Katie Taylor are among those currently visiting Southern Connecticut State University on a trip funded by the School of Humanities and Social Science. LJMU has formed an exciting alliance with SCSU (or 'Southern' to its students and staff), and we hope that lots of students studying English will take up the opportunity to study there for a semester or a year. Ryan, Katie and two other HSS students are experiencing everything Southern, New Haven, and the surrounding area has to offer. As well as New Haven's museums and galleries, they will explore Connecticut's beautiful shoreline (they were instructed to bring their swimming costumes), and visit both the Mark Twain and the Harriet Beecher Stowe houses. New Haven, which is also the location of Yale University, is a mere hour-and-a-half on a train from New York (and around two hours from Boston) - an amazing location for exploring the east coast of the US. On Thursday, 9th...
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Wuthering Heights: Reading English Trip to Haworth

Wuthering Heights: Reading English Trip to Haworth

Paul McFerran is an LJMU English and Creative Writing student at Level 4.  I did not know what to expect when we arrived in Haworth. I suppose I had envisioned a dark and dreary village that had not left the 1800s similar to the landscape of the novel Wuthering Heights. Despite these wild imaginings, Haworth had actually progressed with the rest of the world and I was honestly surprised to feel a familiarity with the place, not because I had been before, but because it was somewhat reminiscent of the countryside I had become accustomed to back home in Ireland. From the bus that brought us to our destination, we were guided towards the local church where we were offered some background to the Brontë family and the lives they led. Emily's mother had died of cancer when she was only three, and her younger sisters Maria and Elizabeth died not long after. To learn that Emily had lost so many family members at...
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