Joseph Thorne

Joseph Thorne

I am a PhD researcher at LJMU English, in receipt of the Fully-funded PhD Scholarship. Before coming to Liverpool, I did my undergraduate degree in English Language and Literature at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where I did a special author paper on Oscar Wilde. I then completed an MA in English Literature in my native Cardiff. My dissertation, supervised by Dr Anthony Mandal, was on the Decadent tendency to define criminality as a form of sainthood. In this project I explored everything from Victorian inner-city cartography to the nature of sin in the proto-weird fiction of Arthur Machen. This gave me a good basis for my current project: a re-reading of the fin-de-siècle illustrator Aubrey Beardsley. While most criticism treats him as a fairly isolated, prickly character, my study will pay particular attention to his place in the social networks of the 1890s. I have given papers at the ‘Medieval Myths and British Identities’ conference (Cardiff University, 18/09/2015) and the ‘Fin de...
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Jennie O’Reilly

Jennie O’Reilly

I am a doctoral student based at LJMU’s Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. My current project explores the representation of African American folk belief in the American imagination from the late nineteenth century to the present. My research is interdisciplinary and draws on a wide range of sources including newsletter publications, oral testimony, literature and film. Prior to my PhD, I graduated from Manchester Metropolitan University with a BA (Hons) in English and History, after which I went on to gain an MA in Cultural History from the University of Liverpool....
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Sam Saunders

Sam Saunders

I'm a PhD student in the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to starting my PhD I studied for a dual-honours degree in English and History at Bangor University, North Wales, before coming to LJMU in September 2014 and completing the MRes (Master of Research) degree in English Literature, passing with distinction. My MRes thesis explored the relationships between gender and character in Victorian detective fiction and how the gender of characters affected the progress of detective narratives across the nineteenth century. My current research interests lie in the study of Victorian sensation, crime and detective fiction, as well as mid-to-late Victorian print culture and the way that these two genres intersect with each other. My PhD research engages with the role of Victorian periodicals between 1861 and 1887 in public perceptions of the police force, detectives and crime. It explores the ways that the public perceived the police through these periodicals, and how this affected the construction of...
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Samuel Caddick

Samuel Caddick

I am a PhD student at the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History and a graduate of both LJMU English’s undergraduate and MRes courses. My research explores the construction of Anglo-Indian social spaces in Raj Fiction 1877—1945 that builds on the work I undertook at Masters level. My research focuses on authors of the Anglo-Indian experience such as E.M. Forster, Rudyard Kipling, Maud Diver, and Sara Jeanette Duncan. I am also interested in the concept of the middlebrow and the literary marketplace, travel writing, and theories of imperialism and space. I currently work with the English department as a research assistant and can be found on Twitter via @sam_caddick....
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Ryan Coogan

Ryan Coogan

Before being awarded one of LJMU's Graduate Teaching Assistantships in 2015, I completed my BA (First with honours, 2012) and MA (Distinction, 2014) in Comparative Literature at the University of Kent. I also received funding for my Masters degree, and upon completion was awarded a prize for the highest distinction within my year group. My thesis explores a tradition of female poets working in the mediums of both poetry and visual art during the 20th century, including women working separately as both poets and painters/sculptors, and women whose poetry contains a strong visual element. Specifically I am examining the visual and performance art of Mina Loy and Elsa Von Freytag-Loringhoven, female Concrete and Language poets such as Mary Ellen Solt, Joan Retallack and Susan Howe, and the performance poetry of Paula Claire. My thesis argues for the consideration of such cross-media work as an inherently feminist act. Previous research topics have included Ezra Pound's involvement and depiction in the photography of Vittorugo...
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Philip Crown

Philip Crown

My research focuses on Robert Story, a Conservative labouring-class writer from the north of Britain—his membership of the self-taught literary tradition, and his cross- class connections with established authors and poets. In its sustained focus on original archive material my study recovers Story’s reading and writing experiences, and contextualises his lifelong pursuit of culture and politics through a series of unpublished manuscripts. My research tests the assumption that all non-radical writing is conservative in form, and argues that it is now necessary to rethink the role of marginalised writers like Story in our contemporary understanding of nineteenth-century working-class literary culture.  ...
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Chloé Holland

Chloé Holland

I am a PhD student at the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to my PhD, I graduated from the University of Salford with a first-class BA (Hons) in English Literature, and from the University of Chester’s Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture MA, for which I achieved a distinction. My BA and MA dissertations focussed on the popular sensation fiction writer Ellen Wood (1814-1887), author of the bestselling East Lynne (1861). My main research interests are Victorian popular fiction, periodicals, and women’s writing, all ofwhich feature in my PhD thesis, which explores the professional identities with which Ellen Wood successfully negotiated the saturated Victorian literary marketplace. There is a wealth of Wood’s fiction as well as her professional strategies as an editor and writer that have yet to receive sufficient academic attention. I hope to contribute to the emerging research into the connections between women writers, periodicals, and professional identities by establishing Wood as a significant figure in terms of self-promotion,...
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Krystina Osborne

Krystina Osborne

Krystina is a PhD student at the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to this, she studied at LJMU for a BA in English, graduating with a First Class Honours degree, and for an MRes in Literature and Cultural History, achieving a Pass with Distinction. Krystina’s MRes thesis was entitled ‘“In the Service of Women”? Developments in Feminism and Female-Authored Erotic Fiction Since the Publication of Angela Carter's The Sadeian Woman’, and focused on authors including Charlotte Roche and Sarah Hall. Her main research interests in contemporary women’s erotic writing and theories of gender and sexuality are reflected in her recent progression to PhD level to conduct research into engagements with female masturbation in contemporary women’s writing and in wider culture, supervised by Dr Kate Houlden and Dr Fiona Tolan. She is currently on the steering group for the Postgraduate Contemporary Women’s Writing Network (PG CWWN) and also works part-time as a bookseller, a role that has intensified her interest...
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