Dr Bella Adams

Teaching: I am currently teaching three undergraduate modules on the English degree: ‘Reading English’, Literary and Cultural Theory 1’ and ‘Race in America.’ I am module leader for ‘Race in America’, which mainly focuses on contemporary black American novels, poetry, film and theory. In the past, I have taught on a wide range of modules in English and American literature, from survey modules to more specialized modules in nineteenth century American writing, modernism, postmodernism, critical theory and contemporary poetry. I welcome inquiries from students interested in pursuing post-graduate degrees in the following topics: Asian American writing; African American writing; race in the US and contemporary race theory; racial and environmental justice discourses; anti-racist pedagogies. I am currently supervising two MRes students in American AIDS crisis writing, specifically in contemporary drama and poetry. Research and publications:  Books: I have published three books -  Amy Tan (Manchester UP, 2005), Asian American Literature (Edinburgh UP, 2008), and, most recently, Asian American Literature and the Environment, which I co-edited with...
Read More

Dr Rebecca Bailey

My teaching and research interests lie in early modern English literature, theatre history, modern drama and textual editing. My monograph Staging the Old Faith: Queen Henrietta Maria and the Theatre of Caroline England, 1625-1642 (Manchester University Press, 2009) explores Caroline theatre as a space which energetically engages with the explosive religious and political concerns of that cultural moment. I have contributed critical essays on the playwright James Shirley to The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature (general editors Garret A. Sullivan and Alan Stewart, Blackwell Publishing, 2012) and James Shirley: New Cultural Perspectives (Ashgate, 2016). I have published articles on the poet and dramatist William Habington, ‘“Staging a Queene Opprest”: William Habington’s Exploration of the Politics of Queenship on the Caroline Stage’, Theatre Journal, 65, 2, (May 2013). Currently, I am working on a modern edition of James Shirley’s The Young Admiral for the AHRC funded The Complete Works of James Shirley (general editors, Eugene Giddens, Teresa Grant and Barbara Ravelhofer, Oxford University...
Read More

Dr Jonathan Cranfield

I received my PhD from the University of Kent in 2011 where I spent four years teaching in the schools of English and History on subjects including Romanticism, critical theory, poetry, American crime fiction and literature & science. I’m currently completing a monograph on the work of Arthur Conan Doyle and his relationship to the Strand Magazine. Current projects also include a broader look at popular magazine fiction from the 1910s and the cultural impact of Gilbert and Sullivan’s light operas. I joined LJMU in the summer of 2012. Contact Details Office: 1.26, John Foster Building, Liverpool, L3 5UZ Email: j.l.cranfield@ljmu.ac.uk Tel.: 01512 315029   Research Interests: Periodical Studies Literature and Science Twentieth-Century Victorians The Work of Arthur Conan Doyle Popular Culture and Ideology Critique I am interested in supervising work at MRes and PhD level on all of these topics.   Teaching In 2013/4 I am convening 5045 “Romanticism and the Real” and teaching on 4011 “Reading English”, 5000 “Literary and Cultural Theory” and 6036 “Vamps and Villains”.   Monograph Twentieth-Century...
Read More

Dr Emily Cuming

Teaching I began working at Liverpool John Moores University in 2017. Before this, I was a Research Fellow at the University of Leeds for three years, during which time I taught undergraduate and MA courses in Victorian and Modern literature. Prior to that I lived in the US for seven years where I taught at a number of liberal arts colleges in Southern California, including a role as Visiting Lecturer in the Interdisciplinary Humanities at Scripps College in Claremont. I received my PhD from the University of Manchester. At LJMU, I currently teach the following courses: Digital Victorians: Investigating the Victorians in the 21st Century (Level 4) Literature in Context: Britain in the 1950s (Level 4) Our House: The Representation of Domestic Space in Contemporary Culture (Level 6) Research My main research interests are in representations of domestic, urban and maritime space; cultural histories of housing from the nineteenth century to the present; the historical relations between narrative form, autobiography and the writing of...
Read More

Dr Alice Ferrebe

My earliest research focused upon the representation of gender in British literature and culture, and resulted in my first book, Masculinity in Male-Authored Fiction 1950-2000. This looked at the influence of conceptions of masculinity on fictional form and theme through a period of intense political and stylistic negotiation, ranging from the (allegedly) Angry Young Men, to the more contemporary confessional literature of Nick Hornby. This research and writing in the field of literary gender studies continues, and I’m also really interested in the performances of gender that are at work in the English classroom – I co-edited a collection of essays that explore this dynamic with my LJMU colleague Fiona Tolan. I’ve become increasingly fascinated with the literature and culture of mid-century Britain, and my book Good, Brave Causes, which covers the decade 1950-1960, was published in 2012 as part of the Edinburgh History of Twentieth-Century Literature in Britain series. The 1950s has acquired almost as many mythic associations as its...
Read More

Dr Brian Gibbons

Research Interests Magic and the occult; seventeenth-century radicalism; Renaissance theatre. Current Projects I am currently writing up research on the Faust legend. I have also begun research on various versions of the myth of Medea, which I propose to carry forward in two directions: a) an exploration of issues of gender and ethnicity in twentieth-century appropriations of the myth; b) a more general study of the figure of the sorceress in Western culture.   SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Books Spirituality and the Occult: from the Renaissance to the Modern Age (Routledge, 2001) Journal Articles ‘Mysticism and Mechanism: The Religious Context of George Cheyne’s Representation of the Body and its Ills’, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 21 (1998), 1-23 Book Chapters Articles for The New Dictionary of National Biography on Richard Overton, Durant Hotham, Francis Lee and Richard Roach....
Read More

Professor Elspeth Graham

From my earlier work on seventeenth-century radicalism, I have extended my interest into research on cultural connections and intersections in the early-modern period.  I am particularly interested in two related areas: human relations with the environment and with other species who co-exist within culture; and the seriousness of play as a component of the identities of different social and cultural groups.  I have published on horses, drama and class relations in the 1630s, and on aristocratic self-writing and identity.  Papers I have given on space, movement and changes in the formation of subjectivity form the basis of a large project, A Gadding Humour: Space, Movement and Identity....
Read More

Dr Colin Harrison

My PhD explored the later fiction of Herman Melville and its treatment of different forms of social and economic exchange. Since then, I have written on 19th century urban disorder, American modernism, and late 20th century cultural and intellectual history. My recent book American Culture in the 1990s is an attempt to comprehend the developments taking place in America at the end of the last millennium, examining a variety of cultural spheres including film, television, radio, music, literature, fine art and digital culture. I am currently supervising doctoral projects on early 19th century Supreme Court history and hobo literature in the modern era. I would be keen to supervise postgraduate research in any area of 19th century American culture, American modernism, intellectual history and visual culture.   PUBLICATIONS Books and articles American Culture in the 1990s (Edinburgh University Press, 2010) “New York City: Travelogue”, www.americansc.org.uk, March 2002 “Nationalism and Cultural Hierarchy in Astor Place, New York on May 10 1849", Over Here 16/1, 1997 Reviews David Rodgers, Age of...
Read More

Dr Sondeep Kandola

My research is largely in the field of national identity with a particular focus on nineteenth and early-twentieth century British literature, gender and sexuality in the period and the Gothic. Other interests include women’s writing, Irish literature of the Romantic and Victorian periods, Decadence and Aestheticism and the literature of empire. In particular, my research engages with the works of Vernon Lee, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Machen and D.H. Lawrence. My current research is primarily concerned with Oscar Wilde and D.H. Lawrence’s conflicted responses to the British Empire. Selected Publications         Vernon Lee (Writers & Their Work)(Northcote House and the British Council, 2012; ISBN: 0746311710) 'Celtic Occultism and the Symbolist Mode in the Fin-de-Siecle Writings of Arthur Machen and W.B. Yeats', English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920. 56 (4): 497-518 (2013) ‘Rereading Oscar Wilde's Intentions for 'the Importance of Doing Nothing'’, Nineteenth-Century Prose 43 (1-2) (Jan 2016) ‘Rehibernicising Wilde? A Genetic Analysis of The Picture of Dorian Gray’, Irish Studies Review (forthcoming)    ...
Read More

Dr Michael Morris

Following a PhD at the University of Glasgow, Michael  became a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Edinburgh. In 2013, he was awarded the G. Ross Roy medal for Best Thesis in Scottish Literature. You can find his Academia.edu profile here. Teaching World Time and Text (Level 4) Literature in Context (Level 4) Literary and Cultural Theory (Level 5) Representing Masculinities (Level 6) Research My research revolves around the cultural history of the Atlantic world, particularly in the long eighteenth century. It takes a transnational perspective and has two main strands. Firstly, it recovers the memory of Caribbean slavery in a Scottish context and considers the implications of this recovery for contemporary debates on Scottish and British identity. Secondly, it engages with theories around archipelagos. Inspired by theories around Caribbean creolization, I consider the implications of re-considering ‘the British Isles’ as an ‘Atlantic Archipelago’. This looks to move beyond current paradigms of Scottish/ Welsh/Irish/ English/ British nationalism to consider the ways that the nations...
Read More

Professor Brian Maidment

Brian joined LJMU English in September 2012 as a part-time Professor of the History of Print. His long teaching career has taken him to wide range of HE institutions including polytechnics, colleges of higher education, and both pre- and post-1992 universities. His central role now is concerned with research, although he does contribute to both post-graduate and undergraduate teaching. His research interests are focussed on the nineteenth century, especially mass circulation, popular and illustrated literature, and he has published widely on a broad range of topics, although more recently he has concentrated his interests on Victorian periodicals and early nineteenth century visual culture. Brian is an extremely experienced supervisor and examiner at Ph.D and M.Phil level, and would welcome applications from students especially on topics concerned with mass circulation Victorian literature and popular culture. A frequently invited speaker at universities and scholarly events in both Europe and North America, Brian is a Visiting Scholar at the Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University,...
Read More

Dr Filippo Menozzi

I hold a PhD from the University of Kent. My research explores the work of Anglophone South Asian women writers and the contested notions of ‘postcolonial’ and ‘world literature’. Main research interests are South Asian literature, the role of intellectuals in postcolonial societies, the links between Marxism, ethics and postcolonial studies, and the narratives of migrants and refugees. Teaching experience in postcolonial literature, Romanticism, critical theory, twentieth-century literature and the contemporary. I am currently working on a co-edited volume on South Asian women writers for the MLA and on anti-imperialist thinker Rosa Luxemburg for the journal New Formations. I am on the editorial board of Cogent Arts & Humanities.   Selected Publications Books "Postcolonial custodianship: Cultural and literary inheritance" (Routledge, 2014) (Book) (ed. with Deepika Bahri) Teaching Anglophone South Asian Women Writers (MLA, in progress (Book) (ed. with Bahriye Kemal and Tinashe Mushakavanhu) Visa Stories: Experiences Between Law and Migration (Cambridge Scholars, 2013) (Book) Journal Articles "Anita Desai and the Ethics of Postcolonial Writing", The Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2016)...
Read More

Professor Joe Moran

I am a cultural historian focusing on Britain in the very recent past, with a particular interest in everyday life. Alongside my academic research, I have written regularly for newspapers and magazines such as the Guardian, the Financial Times, the New Statesman, The Times, Times Higher Education, BBC History Magazine, History Today, Literary Review and others. My most recent books are Queuing for Beginners: The Story of Daily Life from Breakfast to Bedtime, a cultural history of daily habits in Britain in the postwar period inspired in part by the Mass Observation surveys of the 1930s and 1940s; On Roads: A Hidden History, a cultural history of the British motorway system; and Armchair Nation: An Intimate History of Britain in Front of the TV. My book Shrinking Violets: A Field Guide to Shyness will be published by Profile Books in September 2016. A revised North American edition will be published by Yale University Press in spring 2017. I also maintain a...
Read More

Dr Nadine Muller

My research covers literary and cultural histories of women, gender, and feminism from the nineteenth century through to the present day, as well as contemporary women's fiction, and neo-Victorianism. My first monograph - The Widow: A Literary and Cultural History - will be published by Liverpool University Press in late 2017, and I am now working on an oral history and participatory project called War Widows' Stories, which is in receipt of a grant by the Heritage Lottery Fund. I am a member of the AHRC Peer Review College, and I am also a BBC New Generation Thinker. I welcome enquiries from prospective doctoral researchers wishing to work on any combination of the above fields and themes. At LJMU, I teach across all undergraduate levels and postgraduate levels, and I have led the departments' core literary and cultural theory provision as well as covering modules on gender and social media. I have also designed specialist modules such as "Feminist Fictions", which covers women's writing's relationship with feminist...
Read More

Professor Glenda Norquay

I have three main areas of research interest - Robert Louis Stevenson and late nineteenth-century literary culture; Scottish women’s writing; and British women’s suffrage fiction – and my work is driven by an engagement with the intersections of literature and cultural history. Publications in these areas, include Robert Louis Stevenson and Theories of Reading (2007), anthologies of suffrage fiction, essays on Scottish fiction, and The Collected Works of Lorna Moon (2002). I am currently editing Stevenson’s late, unfinished and critically- neglected novel St Ives and have recently returned from research visits to Princeton and Yale libraries and a Fellowship at The Huntington Library, California, looking at various versions of the manuscript. I edited The Edinburgh Companion to Scottish Women’s Writing (Edinburgh University Press, 2012). I have recently completed  the R. L. Stevenson entry for Oxford Bibliographies Online (OUP) and am working on a larger project on late nineteenth-century literary cultures....
Read More

Dr Deaglán Ó Donghaile

Dr Ó Donghaile is Senior Lecturer in English Literature and Cultural History.  He holds a BA (Hons) and PhD from Trinity College, Dublin.  From 2007-9 he was Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Department of English, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, and in 2009 held a visiting fellowship at the UCLA William Andrews Clark Memorial Library.  In 2011 Edinburgh University Press published his monograph,Blasted Literature: Victorian Political Fiction and the Shock of Modernism: http://www.euppublishing.com/book/9780748640676. His research interests lie in the literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and he is interested in supervising research in these areas, with particular regard to political fiction, modernism, popular literature and the work of Oscar Wilde. Research Deaglán Ó Donghaile’s monograph, Blasted Literature: Victorian Political Fiction and the Shock of Modernism, was published by Edinburgh University Press in 2011. This book examines representations of revolutionary and anti-imperialist politics in late Victorian and modernist literature, arguing that nineteenth-century fiction and modernism are linked by their treatment...
Read More

Dr Michael Perfect

I hold a PhD from the University of Cambridge, and before joining LJMU in 2016 I taught at Bilkent University in Ankara, at Cambridge, and in London. My main research and teaching interests are in twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature and culture, with particular emphases on contemporary British literature, postcolonial studies, modernist and postmodernist literature, film and adaptation studies, discrimination and equality studies, and theory. My monograph Contemporary Fictions of Multiculturalism: Diversity and the Millennial London Novel was published in 2014. This book analyses novels of the last three decades that explore ethnic and cultural diversity in London. My work has also appeared in publications such as the Journal of Commonwealth Literature, The Journal of Postcolonial Writing, The Dictionary of Literary Biography, The Literary Encyclopedia, and a number of edited collections. I am currently writing a book on Andrea Levy for Manchester University Press, and am also working on a project that relates to screen adaptations of contemporary transnational fiction. You can visit Michael's website at www.michaelperfect.com...
Read More

Dr Jude Piesse

My first book, British Settler Emigration in Print, 1832-1877 (Oxford University Press, 2016), is about the literary culture of nineteenth-century emigration from Britain, with a particular emphasis upon popular periodicals. My current project brings together developing interests in secret gardens and the life and work of Charles Darwin. It aims to combine academic approaches to research with more creative ways of writing about history and culture. It also extends my interest in concepts of place and mobility. Before joining the department in April 2017, I worked as a Lecturer in English for the University of Chester, based at University Centre Shrewsbury. I have also taught for the University of Exeter, Plymouth University, and as an Associate Lecturer for the Open University. My teaching has spanned a wide range of topics and periods, including nineteenth-century, twentieth-century, and American literature, introductory literature, interdisciplinary humanities, and critical theory courses, and creative writing. I completed my PhD on the literature of nineteenth-century settler emigration at the...
Read More

Dr Joanna Price

Joanna Price’s research expertise is mainly in late-twentieth-century and twenty-first-century American literature.  She is particularly interested in questions of personal and cultural memory, mourning and trauma, as they are explored in recent fiction, autobiography and travel memoir, including polar writing.  She is also interested in pedagogical issues relating to the support and promotion of students’ intellectual and personal development though work experience at home and abroad....
Read More

Dr Helen Rogers

My main teaching and research interests lie in the nineteenth century. I have published books on women and radical culture and on gender and fatherhood, and I am one of the editors of the Journal of Victorian Culture. Currently I am working on a study of crime, punishment and rehabilitation based on the work of the prison visitor Sarah Martin with inmates at Yarmouth Gaol. I am also part of a group working to establish a digital archive of working-class writing to be hosted by Liverpool John Moores University. I am happy to supervise postgraduate research in any of area of nineteenth-century studies but welcome especially students interested in working on inmate culture and prison writing, working-class culture and expression, or on life-writing. Supervisions to date include: Chartist poetry; Punch and public health reform; Blake, the Occult and The Marriage of Heaven and Hell; conservative working-class writers; the garrotting panic in the 1860s; revelatory writing at the fin de siecle. Research I...
Read More

Professor Gerry Smyth

I received my PhD from the University of Staffordshire in 1995, since which time I have taught on the English Programme at Liverpool John Moores University. I have taught on a wide range of subjects during that time, and currently contribute to the teams offering modules on Modernism, Literature and Domestic Space, and Novels of Empire and Adventure. I published my first monograph in 1997, and my eighth in March 2015.   Contact Details Office: 1.28 John Foster Building, Liverpool L3 5UZ Email: G.A.Smyth@ljmu.ac.uk Tel: 0151 2315021   Research Interests Irish Cultural History James Joyce Folk and Popular Music Ecocriticism Modernism   Monographs and Edited Collections The Novel and the Nation: Studies in the New Irish Fiction (London: Pluto Press, 1997) Space and Place: The Geographies of Literature (co-edited with Glenda Norquay) (Liverpool: Liverpool John Moores University Press, 1998) Decolonisation and Criticism: The Construction of Irish Literature (London: Pluto Press, 1998) Explorations in Cultural History (with T.G. Ashplant) (London: Pluto Press, 2000) Space and the Irish Cultural Imagination (Basingstoke...
Read More

Sheena Streather

I’m the Librarian for LJMU English and I look forward to meeting many of you during your time here. I’m here for you for help and support with any of your library enquiries throughout your course. I can help you with things like finding books, navigating your way round the electronic resources, tracing a particular reference, finding journal articles, how to construct an effective search, using databases, referencing, and how to connect to our online services from campus. I’m an English graduate myself; although it was a long time ago, I still remember those daunting reading lists, and turning up at seminars with so many partially read books, with the intention of doing all my talking in the early part of the session, before discussion moved onto the later part of the novel (I do NOT, of course, recommend this strategy)! I never learned to use the library properly though until I did my post-grad Librarianship course, so hopefully I can help...
Read More

Dr Fiona Tolan

I work on contemporary fiction, with a strong emphasis on British and Canadian women's writing. Since completing my PhD (Durham, 2004) on Margaret Atwood and Second Wave Feminism, I've maintained a strong research interest in Atwood's work and recently edited a special issue on Atwood for the journal Contemporary Women's Writing (2017) and am currently writing The Fiction of Margaret Atwood (Palgrave, 2018). My current large research project is a literary cultural analysis of representations of cleaning and housework in post-war women's writing. I use cleaning as a locus for examining intersecting politics of race, gender and class within the public and private spheres. All of this work feeds into my teaching here at LJMU, where I convene the final year module, Post-millennial British Fiction, and teach on Transitions: Writing Between the Wars. I lead the research methods module for MRes students, and I currently supervise PhDs on autoeroticism in contemporary women's writing and punk women's experimental writing of the 1990s....
Read More

Dr Kathryn Walchester

My main research interest is travel writing; in particular eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European journeys by women. I have published monographs on women travellers in Italy and Norway and I am currently working on a monograph about travelling servants. I lead the ‘Genres of Travel’ module at Level 6; the ‘Teaching Strand’ of ‘English in the Workplace’ and ‘Cultures of Childhood’ at Level 5 and lead ‘Reading English’ at Level 4, as well as supervising dissertation students at Level 6 and post-graduate projects at MRes and PhD. With colleagues from University of Liverpool and Liverpool Hope University, I organise the Annual Liverpool Travel Seminar. Research My research interests are writing by late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British travellers and explorers, particularly representations of the north and Italy. I have published work on women travel writers in Italy including ‘Our Own Fair Italy’; Women’s Travel Writing and Italy 1800-1844 ( 2007) and Gamle Norge and Nineteenth-Century British Women Travellers in Norway, a monograph about women...
Read More

Dr James Whitehead

My research interests include Romanticism and its legacies, psychiatry and mental illness in nineteenth and twentieth-century literature, including modernism especially, and life-writing. I arrived at LJMU in 2014. Before that I studied English at Oxford, UCL, and King's College London, where I held a Wellcome postdoctoral fellowship and lectured in English and medical humanities. I have also been a lexicographer for the ongoing third edition of the OED. Teaching I currently teach on the following modules at LJMU: English 4011: Reading English English 5000: Literary and Cultural Theory English 5045 Romanticism and the Real: Politics and Culture in the Nineteenth Century English 6053: Locating Madness I have previously taught postgraduate modules on literature and psychiatry and convened an MSc programme in medical humanities, and taught on undergraduate modules covering life-writing, modernism, 19th century literature, Romanticism, 18th century literature, and introductory courses on studying poetry and language in literature. I have supervised undergraduate and postgraduate dissertations in these areas and am always happy to discuss research plans with prospective...
Read More

Dr Rachel Willie

My research covers seventeenth century literary history and culture. My first book, Staging the Revolution offers a reappraisal of the weight and volume of drama produced from 1647-1672, both in terms of live performances and performances on the paper stage. I drew from my interest in history as fiction to explore how drama was reinvented as a consequence of theatre closure and how it was also used to rewrite the English civil war and commonwealth. Much literature of the 1660s not only sought to present 1660 as a return to rightful governance, but also the start of a new age characterized by unprecedented developments within the arts and the sciences. My book challenged these assumptions (which have continued to underpin periodization) to show that, far from 1660 marking a watershed moment, late seventeenth-century England was intensely concerned with the continuing legacies of recent history and this is revealed in literature printed and disseminated in the period. While researching my book,...
Read More