LJMU English’s Jade Dowie Reviews for Everyman Website

LJMU English’s Jade Dowie Reviews for Everyman Website

Now, all LJMU English students know that they can use their student card to buy tickets to shows at the Everyman Playhouse for as little as £5. But we're still more excited that those lovely folk at E&P are giving two free tickets to every Press Night in the new season to an LJMU English student whose review will then be featured on the theatre's own website, in potentially the perfect, high-profile start to their reviewing career. Shauna Hughes, a first year single honours student, wrote a great review of an earlier show, The Star, at the start of the year - its director was so impressed, he tweeted about it! Jade Dowie is a final year single hours student, and her review of Fiddler on the Roof is now up on the E&P site. Jade said, 'I'm a huge theatre lover and the Everyman is one of my favourite venues so I was very excited to be given the opportunity to review Fiddler on the Roof, the...
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Reading Is Good For You

Reading Is Good For You

"Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing." - Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird. We all have our own stories of how we became readers, whether you were introduced to reading as a child, or came to it of your own free will. The most important thing is that you found books, or did they find you? I have always felt a need to read and have always been surrounded by books. I was always read to as a child, and I can still remember the first book I bought with my own money, Roald Dahl's The Witches. It was not just the ability to disappear into other lands, and to partake in adventures, but something far more intrinsic to my general being. I always have a book on the go and I always have anthologies of poems around me, so that I can pick something up and put it down...
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North-West Print Culture Research Network Meeting

North-West Print Culture Research Network Meeting

Wednesday 28th October 2015 saw the first meeting of the North West Print Culture Research Network. Created in association with the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP), the Network is an exciting new collaboration between several North West institutions designed to discuss different research projects and in the future produce collaborative research opportunities in the field of print culture and periodical research.   Brian Maidment (LJMU): Reading Victorian Periodical Illustration - A Workshop This first session was hosted by Edge Hill University and featured a wide variety of workshops, talks and papers from academics working and researching in the field of print culture from across several institutions in the North West, including Edge Hill University, Liverpool John Moores University and Manchester Metropolitan University. After a brief introduction provided by Bob Nicholson of Edge Hill University, the first session of the day was presented by Professor Brian Maidment (LJMU), and was split into two halves. Firstly, an introduction to the ‘Origins of the Popular Press’...
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Nadine Muller Records Programme for BBC Radio 3

Nadine Muller Records Programme for BBC Radio 3

In April this year I was announced as one of the AHRC / BBC Radio 3 New Generation Thinkers 2015. Out of 550+ applicants, ten of us were eventually selected for this opportunity to bring our research and ideas to both the airwaves and to screen. My first broadcast took the form of a five minute essay on Victorian widows for an edition of Radio 3's Free Thinking, presented by Rana Mitter and recorded at the Hay Festival earlier this year (you can listen back to the whole programme here). Yesterday, on Remembrance Sunday, I was able to record my first ever edition of The Essay, which resulted the interesting challenge to condense 200 years of the history of widows in Britain into a 15 minute script fit for broadcast and of interest to the general public, in a way that would neither send radio listeners nor my live audience to sleep! My producer - the wonderful Jacqueline Smith - was very hands-on and...
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Marginal Irish Modernisms

Marginal Irish Modernisms

In May 2015 the English programme's Dr Gerry Smyth and Dr Deaglan O Donghaile won a major grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council to develop an international network on the topic of Marginal Irish Modernisms. Gerry and Deaglan have strong interests in this area, and are looking to build a dynamic, multi-disciplinary network of international scholars researching in the field of Irish modernism beyond the pervasive influence of high profile figures such as W.B. Yeats, James Joyce and Samuel Beckett. In partnership with institutions in London (St Mary's College, Twickenham) and Dublin (Trinity College), the intention is to run a series of academic and public engagement events, culminating in a major international conference in Liverpool in October 2016. As part of the impact agenda for the network, Gerry has organised five events to run in conjunction with this year's Liverpool Irish Festival, including film and play premieres, a public lecture, a concert and a book event at Liverpool Central Library (more information to follow).          ...
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Teaching the British 1950s in China, 2015

Teaching the British 1950s in China, 2015

Each year, Shanghai University run an 'International Semester' in June, when students completing their first year of study have the chance to pick short courses across a range of disciplines that are designed and taught by academics from outside China. In June this year, I was lucky enough to be one of those 60 or so teachers myself, and offered a course based upon material both from my last book, Good, Brave Causes: Literature of the 1950s, and my experience on teaching one of LJMU English's first year modules, Literature in Context. I stayed on campus - which, as SU has just under 40,000 students, is like a town within the city, with canteens, sports facilities, and supermarkets, and dormitories sleeping four undergraduates to a room. My class consisted of 32 students studying a wide variety of subjects, from engineering to... well, English. Though all of the students had studied the English language since primary school, not all of them had practice in...
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Katie Taylor

Katie Taylor

Age: 28 From: The Wirral Level 6 k.taylor1@2014.ljmu.ac.uk As a single parent it was important to me when applying to university that I made a decision that would benefit both me and my son. I wanted to make sure it was worth my time to do a degree at this point in my life, and my experience of LJMU so far has definitely exceeded my expectations. Choosing to study English was simple as it’s the only subject I’ve ever truly loved (and bothered to do the homework for at school). I was drawn to LJMU because of the diverse range of texts studied and assessment methods; I know that I will graduate with a broader set of skills and experience than I would have elsewhere. Having grown up on The Wirral I thought I knew Liverpool pretty well, but being a student here has given me a new perspective on what the city has to offer. I obviously love to read and you can...
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Lynne Wainwright

Lynne Wainwright

Age: 35 From Skelmersdale Level 6 l.wainwright@2014.ljmu.ac.uk The main reason I chose English was because I have always been passionate about Literature and love to read. Furthermore, English has many transferable skills that can be applied to many careers. After attending open days at different universities and looking through course details I chose LJMU. As a mature student it was important to me that I chose somewhere I felt comfortable and where I thought I would fit in. The tutors I met at LJMU were the most enthusiastic and helpful: this put me at ease instantly. The course content at LJMU was also the most interesting consisting of a wide range of texts and modules. The last two years at LJMU have been wonderful, my initial thoughts, regarding the tutors and the course, were correct. The tutors are friendly and always happy to help. The varying texts and ways of assessment enable you to explore other aspects of literature, like their respective historical and cultural contexts....
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Bev Grannell

Bev Grannell

21 Level 5 From Liverpool B.A.Grannell@2014.ljmu.ac.uk If you would have told the thirteen year old me that I would currently be studying English, you would have been met with immense disbelief, yet, here I am! It wasn’t until I had left my first year of college that I truly discovered my passion for English Literature, prior to that my only real experience of the subject was when I had been forced to read Of Mice and Men for GCSE English and find the symbolism of the American Dream within the Great Depression era novella, but now that my circumstances had drastically changed, so had my approach to reading. Throughout my life, books have always been a means of escape for me but it wasn’t until I was diagnosed with depression that I found I could truly connect with characters in a way that I never had before and I was able to see the symbolism within. Choosing to study at LJMU, was a difficult...
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Beth Gribbin

Beth Gribbin

20 From Liverpool Level 5 B.Gribbin@2013.ljmu.ac.uk   When it came to choosing my course at university I didn’t have to think much because English has always been a subject that I’ve enjoyed and seemed to do well in. When I looked at the outline of the course at John Moore’s it was very impressive as it wasn’t just a conventional English course as you are assessed in a variety of ways, not just the typical essay format. The course allows you to look at different aspects of literature by gaining an insight into the historical context of a novel too. The course offers a diverse range of books which are not just traditional novels and classics, you study modern literature alongside the more traditional. One of the main reasons I chose the university, besides the course, was because of the amazing student health and wellbeing centre. They offer a wide range of help with financial issues, accommodation, counselling and specialist mental health support. They...
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LJMU English Lecturer to Teach in China

LJMU English Lecturer to Teach in China

LJMU English's Alice Ferrebe is leaving for China this week, to teach a short course based upon her research specialism to students at Shanghai University, as part of their International Term. Undergraduates at SU study for a total of four years, and in the third term of their first year, they are able to select a range of modules designed and taught by academics from abroad. Alice will be teaching a literature module focussed upon the representation of youth in post-Second World War British writing, which will draw upon material used in LJMU English's Level 4 'Literature in Context' course. Alice said, 'I was lucky enough to be able to visit the Chinese Literature department at Shanghai University last year, and ever since then I've been wondering what it would be like to teach British culture and literature to Chinese students. I've become obsessed with the idea of finding out what students from such a different background might make of Alan Sillitoe's short story...
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Dr Nadine Muller Announced as One of This Year’s New Generation Thinkers

Dr Nadine Muller Announced as One of This Year’s New Generation Thinkers

The nationwide search for the brightest minds with the potential to share their cutting-edge academic ideas via radio and television is over, and we're delighted to say that our very own Dr Nadine Muller is one of them! BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) have unveiled the ten academics - and their research - who will be the New Generation Thinkers 2015. Nadine has worked on projects exploring the Victorians in the 21st century, as well as carrying out research relating to women and belief. As a New Generation Thinker, she will be broadcasting her research on the history of widows in British literature and culture in order to share it with the public. New Generation Thinkers 2015 has been a successful first step for many academics, with previous thinkers going on to appear across television and radio. The ten New Generation Thinkers 2015 were selected from over five hundred applications from academics at the start of their careers, who...
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Congratulations LJMU English Graduates!

Congratulations LJMU English Graduates!

Monday wasn't the sunniest day, but the Graduation of our 'Class of 2015' was still a brilliant occasion. Congratulations to all the single- and joint-honours students who have studied with us over the last three (or so) years: we were delighted that so many of you came back to the John Foster building for a drink and a strawberry or two to celebrate. Please do keep in touch and let us know all the amazing things you get up to, either via individual tutors or via this website. As you can see, the gallery below is somewhat dominated by pictures of your tutors looking daft impressive in their robes. If you'd like to add some of your own pictures of the festivities to the LJMU English site (yourself looking daft, or daft, or just plain gorgeous in your robe, for instance), please just email them to Alice Ferrebe (High resolution, medium size, if possible!) with a sentence confirming your permission. We wish all our graduates...
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Did She Kill Him? A Talk With The Author

Did She Kill Him? A Talk With The Author

Kate Colquhoun’s novel Did She Kill Him?On Thursday 5th February esteemed author, lecturer and academic Kate Colquhoun graced Liverpool John Moore’s University with her presence to talk to intrigued students and staff members alike about her historical retelling of a Merseyside story, Did She Kill Him? In brief, Kate explores the interesting case of Florence Maybrick, who in 1889 was arrested and put on trial for the alleged murder of her cotton merchant husband, James Maybrick. Method? (Arsenic) Poison. Motive? Adultery. Florence, a sweet (?), innocent (?) and virtuous (?) Alabama girl is represented in Kate’s novel as being the victim of a malicious judicial system which callously singled out a naïve and fragile widower. Further, Kate suggests that Florence was systematically and categorically alienated, isolated and finally subjugated by a hostile and altogether unwelcoming (British) milieu which failed to adopt her. Further, the entrepreneur’s untimely demise was shrouded in mystery from the offset, captivating the intrigue of the British media,...
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Shelf Lives, Liverpool Central Library, 10th December 2014

Shelf Lives, Liverpool Central Library, 10th December 2014

The final 'Shelf Lives' event of 2014 ran at Liverpool's Central Library on 10th December. In these sessions, three members of staff from LJMU English talk about books from the Library's holdings that have particularly inspired them. This usually results in an eclectic mix of literary material and discussion topics, and this event was no exception. James Whitehead talked about his fascination with the slippery double narrative of James Hogg’s Confessions of a Justified Sinner (1824). Jo Croft introduced many of the audience to the work of Denton Welch, a novelist, poet and painter, through the posthumously published  A Last Sheaf (1951), discussing his life, writing and poetry. Finally, Ross Dawson discussed the complex politics and irascible humour of the first volume of Alexei Sayle’s autobiography Stalin Ate My Homework (2010). Shelf Lives will continue in the New Year - please keep an eye on both this website and that of the Central Library for details. Everyone is very welcome....
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