North-West Print Culture Research Network Meeting

North-West Print Culture Research Network Meeting

Wednesday 28th October 2015 saw the first meeting of the North West Print Culture Research Network. Created in association with the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP), the Network is an exciting new collaboration between several North West institutions designed to discuss different research projects and in the future produce collaborative research opportunities in the field of print culture and periodical research.   Brian Maidment (LJMU): Reading Victorian Periodical Illustration - A Workshop This first session was hosted by Edge Hill University and featured a wide variety of workshops, talks and papers from academics working and researching in the field of print culture from across several institutions in the North West, including Edge Hill University, Liverpool John Moores University and Manchester Metropolitan University. After a brief introduction provided by Bob Nicholson of Edge Hill University, the first session of the day was presented by Professor Brian Maidment (LJMU), and was split into two halves. Firstly, an introduction to the ‘Origins of the Popular Press’...
Read More
Research Seminar: Dr Fionualla Dillane, ‘New Old Formalism, Old New Historicism, Victorian Periodicals and the Problem of Genre’

Research Seminar: Dr Fionualla Dillane, ‘New Old Formalism, Old New Historicism, Victorian Periodicals and the Problem of Genre’

10th March, 2015. After a warm welcome to LJMU from Professor Brian Maidment, Dr Fionualla Dillane from University College Dublin outlined the crux of her discussion. Is the study of periodicals under threat from the ‘new old formalism’ that encourages the researcher to think of the periodical as a ‘training ground’ for writers approaching established forms. By broaching the muddy waters of genre using the return to formalism, genre, Fionualla suggested, is a methodological tool and a conceptual frame. The study of periodicals has always been interdisciplinary due to the diverse field and contents of periodicals. Fionualla unpacked the concept of new formalism, giving rich analysis of the pivotal texts and argued that a return to formalism privileges the literary, which, by extension, deprivileges other texts defined as lacking literary merit and designated as craft. This is a conservative approach which Fioualla successfully argued is ‘turning back’. Fionualla argued that the study of periodicals is still at the stage of description rather than...
Read More
Chloé Holland

Chloé Holland

I am a PhD student at the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to my PhD, I graduated from the University of Salford with a first-class BA (Hons) in English Literature, and from the University of Chester’s Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture MA, for which I achieved a distinction. My BA and MA dissertations focussed on the popular sensation fiction writer Ellen Wood (1814-1887), author of the bestselling East Lynne (1861). My main research interests are Victorian popular fiction, periodicals, and women’s writing, all ofwhich feature in my PhD thesis, which explores the professional identities with which Ellen Wood successfully negotiated the saturated Victorian literary marketplace. There is a wealth of Wood’s fiction as well as her professional strategies as an editor and writer that have yet to receive sufficient academic attention. I hope to contribute to the emerging research into the connections between women writers, periodicals, and professional identities by establishing Wood as a significant figure in terms of self-promotion,...
Read More