Sam Saunders Edits New Issue of “Law, Crime and History”

The new issue of Law, Crime and History journal has been published featuring work by LJMU PhD candidate Sam Saunders. Sam, along with Setphen Basdeo (Leeds Trinity), also edited and introduced the issue which has a broad focus crime history and crime literature. Contributors to Law, Crime and History originally presented their work at a successful conference at LJMU entitled "Lives, Trials, and Executions: Perspectives on Crime, 1700–1900" in 2017. Sam notes that “the aim of the conference was to bring together scholars working on crime history and crime fiction from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the editorial aim of the journal was really to reflect that breadth”. Sam’s own contribution to the journal is a study of mid-Victorian police memoir fiction, a largely forgotten genre of literature which helped to prepare readers for later iterations of crime and detective fiction. His interest in the subject was sparked by his ground-breaking PhD research into the lost periodical origins of detective fiction....
Read More
Sam Saunders

Sam Saunders

I'm a PhD student in the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to starting my PhD I studied for a dual-honours degree in English and History at Bangor University, North Wales, before coming to LJMU in September 2014 and completing the MRes (Master of Research) degree in English Literature, passing with distinction. My MRes thesis explored the relationships between gender and character in Victorian detective fiction and how the gender of characters affected the progress of detective narratives across the nineteenth century. My current research interests lie in the study of Victorian sensation, crime and detective fiction, as well as mid-to-late Victorian print culture and the way that these two genres intersect with each other. My PhD research engages with the role of Victorian periodicals between 1861 and 1887 in public perceptions of the police force, detectives and crime. It explores the ways that the public perceived the police through these periodicals, and how this affected the construction of...
Read More