Literary and Cultural Theory

Literary and Cultural Theory

This module will introduce you to the main areas of literary and cultural theory and teach you how to apply them to literary texts as well as teaching you to think critically about just about everything: films, TV, current events, family dinners, you think of it and by the end of this module you'll be able to crticially analyse it. You'll learn about Psychoanalysis, Marxism, Postcolonial Theory, and Feminism. You'll have two sessions on each approach, which will mean you'll get to grips with the main concepts of the theory, and then work on applying them 'in practice'. The assessment for this module is in two parts, a presentation and an essay. For the presentation you'll be asked to prepare, in small groups, about 10 minutes on one of the theories, demonstrating how you would apply it to a text, film, music video, song, etc, of your choice. For example, you might do a feminist reading of a Shakespeare play, or take a...
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Nadine Muller Records Programme for BBC Radio 3

Nadine Muller Records Programme for BBC Radio 3

In April this year I was announced as one of the AHRC / BBC Radio 3 New Generation Thinkers 2015. Out of 550+ applicants, ten of us were eventually selected for this opportunity to bring our research and ideas to both the airwaves and to screen. My first broadcast took the form of a five minute essay on Victorian widows for an edition of Radio 3's Free Thinking, presented by Rana Mitter and recorded at the Hay Festival earlier this year (you can listen back to the whole programme here). Yesterday, on Remembrance Sunday, I was able to record my first ever edition of The Essay, which resulted the interesting challenge to condense 200 years of the history of widows in Britain into a 15 minute script fit for broadcast and of interest to the general public, in a way that would neither send radio listeners nor my live audience to sleep! My producer - the wonderful Jacqueline Smith - was very hands-on and...
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Conference: Women Writing Pleasure, 3 July 2015

Conference: Women Writing Pleasure, 3 July 2015

We are thrilled to announce that LJMU English will be hosting a one-day conference on "Women Writing Pleasure" on 3 July 2015. Focusing on all genres of women's writing from the nineteenth century through to the present day, the event will facilitate discussion on the numerous ways in which women writers have conceptualised, described, and engaged with various forms of pleasure, from the intellectual to the sexual, from the material to the psychological, and beyond. The conference is co-organised by PhD researchers Chloe Holland and Krystina Osborne and by Dr Nadine Muller. To read the call for papers, download the conference poster, and more information about the event, please visit the dedicated conference website at http://www.womenwritingpleasure.com....
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Krystina Osborne

Krystina Osborne

Krystina is a PhD student at the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to this, she studied at LJMU for a BA in English, graduating with a First Class Honours degree, and for an MRes in Literature and Cultural History, achieving a Pass with Distinction. Krystina’s MRes thesis was entitled ‘“In the Service of Women”? Developments in Feminism and Female-Authored Erotic Fiction Since the Publication of Angela Carter's The Sadeian Woman’, and focused on authors including Charlotte Roche and Sarah Hall. Her main research interests in contemporary women’s erotic writing and theories of gender and sexuality are reflected in her recent progression to PhD level to conduct research into engagements with female masturbation in contemporary women’s writing and in wider culture, supervised by Dr Kate Houlden and Dr Fiona Tolan. She is currently on the steering group for the Postgraduate Contemporary Women’s Writing Network (PG CWWN) and also works part-time as a bookseller, a role that has intensified her interest...
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Dr Fiona Tolan

I work on contemporary fiction, with a strong emphasis on British and Canadian women's writing. Since completing my PhD (Durham, 2004) on Margaret Atwood and Second Wave Feminism, I've maintained a strong research interest in Atwood's work and recently edited a special issue on Atwood for the journal Contemporary Women's Writing (2017) and am currently writing The Fiction of Margaret Atwood (Palgrave, 2018). My current large research project is a literary cultural analysis of representations of cleaning and housework in post-war women's writing. I use cleaning as a locus for examining intersecting politics of race, gender and class within the public and private spheres. All of this work feeds into my teaching here at LJMU, where I convene the final year module, Post-millennial British Fiction, and teach on Transitions: Writing Between the Wars. I lead the research methods module for MRes students, and I currently supervise PhDs on autoeroticism in contemporary women's writing and punk women's experimental writing of the 1990s....
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