Professor Joe Moran: LJMU English Research Stands Up

Last week at the Everyman Bistro, LJMU launched Liverpool Bright Club, an innovative comedy night on which professional performers were accompanied by LJMU lecturers in a series of stand up sets. Billed as the ‘thinking person’s variety night’, the aim of Bright Club is to spread the word about university research in an entertaining format. LJMU English's Professor Joe Moran, whose research work is focussed upon everyday experience in Britain's recent past, took part in this pioneering night to present ideas from his most recent book Shrinking Violets: A Field Guide to Shyness.  Joe reflected, 'It was an interesting process trying to fit your research into the form of stand-up, as what we do when we lecture is vaguely similar but also very different. I’m used to extemporising in lectures and you can’t really do that in a routine: you have to learn the whole thing off by heart because the lines only work when you say them a very specific way. The organiser, Tim Miles, told...
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‘His fourth… and best’: Joe Moran’s Book on Shyness in the Limelight

‘His fourth… and best’: Joe Moran’s Book on Shyness in the Limelight

Joe Moran, Professor of English and Cultural History at LJMU, has published his fourth book: Shrinking Violets: A Field Guide to Shyness (Profile Books). It is a literary, cultural and historical reflection on what Charles Darwin called “this odd state of mind”: shyness. Since then, Joe's latest work has been read, discussed and praised across the media, and across the world. The Guardian review called Shrinking Violets 'fantastic and involving', the Daily Mail deemed it 'nimble' (!), the Herald loved its 'illuminating stories gathered from across the world', and the Spectator its 'beautiful descriptions of the anguish of the shy'. At the start of September Shrinking Violets was BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week, read by Nigel Planer. Joe himself has been hard at work promoting his book: and all while never missing a lecture or seminar! He appeared on the BBC Radio 4 programme Thinking Allowed, in discussion with Laurie Taylor and the sociologist of shyness Susie Scott. He also appeared on The Forum on the BBC World Service, discussing shyness and introversion with the...
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Shrinking Violets: Radio 4’s Book of the Week

Shrinking Violets: Radio 4’s Book of the Week

LJMU English's Professor Joe Moran's latest book, Shrinking Violets, will be Book of the Week on Radio 4 next week, starting on Monday 29th August. Joe's 'Field Guide to Shyness' will be read by Nigel Planer. If you miss an episode, you'll be able to listen again here. Can't wait until Monday? You can also read Joe's fantastic essay previewing the book on the Guardian website here.  ...
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LJMU Writers’ Workshop presents Robert MacFarlane at Tate Liverpool

LJMU Writers’ Workshop presents Robert MacFarlane at Tate Liverpool

We’re excited that the LJMU Writers’ Workshop, run by our colleagues in Creative Writing, has invited Robert Macfarlane to come and speak at Tate Liverpool on Thursday 16 June. Macfarlane is best known for three widely acclaimed and beautifully written books that he describes as a ‘loose trilogy of books about landscape and the human heart’: Mountains of the Mind (2003), The Wild Places (2007) and The Old Ways (2012). These books are all about the human need to encounter the wildness of nature – whether it is by climbing a mountain or shinning up a tree in a suburban park. Macfarlane sees these encounters with wildness as an antidote to what he calls, in The Wild Places, our ‘retreat from the real … a prising away of life from place, an abstraction of experience into different kinds of touchlessness’. His most recent book is Landmarks (2015), an exploration of how the words we use to describe the natural world can help to reconnect us with it, and which he describes as ‘a glossary of enchantment...
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How We Used To Live: LJMU English Hosts Northern Film Premiere

How We Used To Live: LJMU English Hosts Northern Film Premiere

First shown at the 2013 London Film Festival, How We Used To Live is a poetic collage-history of London, setting colour footage from the BFI National Archive to the hazy, beautiful music of Saint Etienne. Produced by the filmmaking collective of the band with writer Travis Elborough and director Paul Kelly, it looks back at Britain from the 1950s to the 1980s, with some scenes lost to contemporary Britain, but some still profoundly resonant. The film will be screened on Thursday, 14th October 2014 at 5.30pm in John Foster 121, and Travis Elborough will answer questions afterwards. You can watch a trailer of the film here. ...
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Professor Joe Moran’s ‘Intimate History’ of British TV Gets Rave Reviews

Professor Joe Moran’s ‘Intimate History’ of British TV Gets Rave Reviews

Professor of English and Cultural History, Joe Moran, has just released his latest book, ‘Armchair Nation: An Intimate History of Britain in Front of the TV’, which tells the story of television over the generations. A follow-up to his critically-acclaimed book, ‘Queuing for Beginners’, Joe’s fascinating and perceptive observations on British life chart viewing habits and programme developments throughout the years, covering major milestones such as the Queen’s Coronation and the first televised FA Cup Final in 1953, the first moon landing, telly going colour, Ted Heath’s proposed 10.30pm TV curfew in 1973, the popularity of the Sopranos and US imports of the ‘naughties’ and the impact shows like the X Factor has had on the viewing public. Read a full review of the book here from Saturday’s Observer Commenting on the book, Joe said: "It’s not so much a history of TV as a history of watching TV. The challenge for me was to write about something that is such an everyday feature of...
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