Don’t want to leave us? Come and Study on our Masters by Research!

Don’t want to leave us? Come and Study on our Masters by Research!

LJMU English welcomes applications for our MRes programme for 2017-18. This is a year-long course that gives you the opportunity to realise a research project of your own devising, under guidance from an individual supervisor and alongside a lively community of postgraduate students within and beyond the English department. You’ll learn about new critical approaches in literary studies, attend workshops on professional skills from writing for publication to creating podcasts, take part in a research retreat at Gladstone's Library in Hawarden and encounter a wide range of specialist interests in the department through research seminars and reading groups. Come and develop your research skills with us! See the postgraduate pages on this site or for further information and application links see the University web page: https://www.ljmu.ac.uk/study/courses/postgraduates/english. Please note that the deadline for applications is Monday 17th July, 2017. We will consider applications after this date but places may not be available. Remember too that if you are an LJMU Alumni, you should be eligible for a 20%...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Understanding the US University System

Study Abroad at SCSU: Understanding the US University System

I take real solace in that if in the post below I am unable to fully explain the American system compared to the UK system that it is primarily because no one else seems to completely understand it either. I have heard the process of applying for classes as 'a bit like the Hunger Games' more than once. Now, as an international Study Abroad student, a lot of this will not be applicable to you. But it is important to understand the people who will surround you every day. So why is your classmate taking a ‘level 200’ History class as a 6th year Senior? Let's find out... As I explain the most basic basics, it should be clear that despite its complexities, the US system offers more opportunities to study a varied range of subjects and modules than we're used to in the UK. Whereas at home we are 'Majors' from day one of university, the American system offers scope for students to...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Your American Grades and How to Understand Them

Study Abroad at SCSU: Your American Grades and How to Understand Them

Unfortunately, travelling across the Atlantic has not necessarily turned you into a genius... Jessica Rimmer guides you through the differences in the US grading system.  The expression of marks and grades differ greatly between the UK and the US. As percentage values don't carry the same grade weight, marks in the US are generally higher to those we're used at LJMU. It's fairly usual for students to receive marks in the 80 - 100% range, as this is considered the threshold for good work. Once tutors establish a student's percentage grade, they are able to convert it into a letter grade (A, B, C, D or F), which is then recorded on the student’s transcript. It is important to keep this in mind when receiving your percentage grades, as your interpretation of them may be clouded by your understanding of the UK grading system. For instance, if you were to receive 85% on your transcript in the US, you've not necessarily enhanced...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Taylor’s Tips

Study Abroad at SCSU: Taylor’s Tips

LJMU English intern Jessica Rimmer met SCSU student, Taylor Bird, to share her experience of studying abroad, and get her advice to students who are considering crossing the Atlantic in the other direction. Taylor spent one month studying French in Paris and stayed in a French University for the duration of her trip. When I asked about her highlight of the experience, Taylor revealed that, 'you make connections with people and you get to form strong relationships which result in lifelong friendships. One of the people that I'm now working with is a friend I met in Paris and we're still really close, we live together'. Taylor went on to offer some brilliant advice to students who are considering studying abroad in the future. She said: 'My advice is definitely do it! Whether you're just thinking about it or having doubts, just figure it out later - make it happen. Also, don't be afraid to do new things whilst you're abroad because that's one...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Southern’s English Programme

Study Abroad at SCSU: Southern’s English Programme

What (and how) will you be studying on Southern Connecticut State University's English modules? Rupert French investigates... During our time at Southern we were fortunate enough to meet up with several Professors of the English department, who helped us understand the differences in their learning strategies for students. Professor Charles Baraw teaches a module on comic books, 'Comics and the American Experience'. He gets his students to learn how to read comics differently from standard fiction. As well as studying from a diverse set of texts such as Maus (and hopefully We:3, all about the Grant Morrison love), certain classes also learn how to create their own storyboards based around topics of their choice. Professor Melissa Talhelm teaches a module titled 'Lyrics as Literature' that looks at lyric composition as a form, but is primarily a creative writing course. Professor Talhelm is also a singer-songwriter and a Richard Thompson fan. You should definitely, definitely take these classes if they're on offer when you arrive. What becomes apparent through...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: English in America

Study Abroad at SCSU: English in America

Featured Image: 'Flag' by Jasper Johns, 1954, in the Museuem of Modern Art, NYC This summer sixteen lucky LJMU students had the opportunity to spend 3 weeks at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, USA, and I was one of them. Our two universities have set up a 'transatlantic alliance' to open up possibilities for study abroad for their students. SCSU laid on a full and exciting programme of activities across Connecticut for us, and these are my English-related highlights! Libraries I Saw Obviously the first thing I needed to know as an English student abroad was, where is the nearest library? Southern's Hilton .C. Buley Library on campus was my first stop. Don't tell the Aldham Robarts, but it was a pretty impressive building, smack bang in the middle of the beautiful New Haven campus (the sunshine helped too, I guess). The library boasts some very fancy Tiffany stained-glass windows and, most importantly, its own Starbucks, not to mention an array of spectacular and comfortable chairs...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: What can you do in New Haven?

Study Abroad at SCSU: What can you do in New Haven?

Though I was lucky enough to be visiting New Haven, Southern Connecticut whilst being of legal drinking age to enjoy some of the later activities to be offered by the city, you may not be. But there is so much on offer at this SCSU and in this town you will never run out of things to do. American youth are adept at sobriety, and damn, they do it well. Here I offer just some of the ways in which you can fully enjoy and appreciate the area, with no need for the troublesome liquor of Caliban’s downfall. So don’t be silly and try it on with America's laws: take this opportunity to enjoy yourself in different ways... Join Bookmarks: Bookmarks is a society currently presided over by an English Major called Urfa Kadeer. It is not a requirement to talk about books or even be an English Major, it’s just a starting point for meeting other students. Bookmarks host fun-filled evenings of frivolity such...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Getting around in New Haven – What do you do without a car?

Study Abroad at SCSU: Getting around in New Haven – What do you do without a car?

So - you're an LJMU student, studying abroad at SCSU, and unlike practically every American friend you meet, you (whisper it, for shame) don't have a car. LJMU English intern Jessica Rimmer is here to help. One wonderful attribute of SCSU is the proximity of its beautiful campus to a town packed full of culture and entertainment, and with the FREE services offered to students of SCSU, getting around New Haven without a car has actually never been easier. U-Pass The U-Pass is a transportation pass for Southern students, that is valid for unlimited trips during the semester, on all CTTransit local buses. Therefore, the U-Pass gives you travel freedom with no out-of-pocket expense! As an enrolled student of SCSU you are eligible to receive a complimentary U-Pass, from the Hoot Loot card office located in the Wintergreen Building, 112. To use your U-Pass you just show the driver your SCSU Hoot Loot ID Card when boarding the bus and insert the pass, with the arrow...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Where Will I Stay?

Study Abroad at SCSU: Where Will I Stay?

Thinking of studying abroad as part of LJMU's 'transatlantic alliance' with Southern Connecticut State University? You'll want to know where you're going to live. Here, LJMU English student Jessica Rimmer gives you an idea of the kind of accommodation on offer on campus.  Schwartz Hall offers apartment-style living for students with 45+ credits including three different housing options (two-, four-, or six-person apartments). Each apartment has a full kitchen equipped with stove/oven, sink and garbage disposal, full-sized refrigerator, and dishwasher. Individually controlled heating and air conditioning units are located in each apartment. The two-person apartment is studio-style with a large open area adjacent to the kitchen. A full bathroom and small walk-in storage area are also provided in the apartment. A dining room table and couches are provided for the living area. Finally, each student is provided with a bed, mattress, dresser, desk, and chair. The four-person apartments offer the same amenities as the two-person apartments, but in the four-person apartments, the living...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: ‘Geography of Wine’ Class – Over 21s Only

Study Abroad at SCSU: ‘Geography of Wine’ Class – Over 21s Only

Now this section is very far from being a humble brag about hanging out with a group of students drinking wine, although yeah... Being over the legal drinking age in the US, I partook in a few field trips and classes with the 'Geography of Wine' class to get an idea of the versatility of the educational opportunities on offer at SCSU. Apart from introducing me to some great people, it gave me a chance to see American students interact with a Professor as well as giving me scope on how the American system works. Also I got to drink some wine. As a writing credit at SCSU, Seniors may take a class in the geography of wine. (The structure of degrees in the US is, at first, a bit daunting for those of us in the standard UK three year system. To orientate yourself, read my post elsewhere on this site.) Most of those who I joined on this trip were either Geography...
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Study Abroad at LJMU: University Study in the UK

Study Abroad at LJMU: University Study in the UK

Now compared to your fiendishly complicated system in the USA (that's how it seems to an outsider anyway!), the UK system is relatively straight forward for British students. In the UK, most students buy an (expensive!) ticket for the subject (or combined subjects) of their choice, get on and travel straight to their destination/graduation over three years of full-time study. For the most part, students study on single-honours programmes (that is, they major in one subject from the very start of their course, like Mathematics or English), or joint-honours, which combine the study of two subjects (Criminology and Psychology, for example). LJMU students take six modules per year, three in each semester (and our semesters run from September-December, and January-April), for 20 credits per module. On some programmes, all modules will be core (that is, obligatory), but on most students take a combination of core and optional modules. (In my second year of study on single-honours English, I chose the 'Working the USA' module, hence why I’m talking to...
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Study Abroad at LJMU: Your British grades and how to understand them

Study Abroad at LJMU: Your British grades and how to understand them

The main message here is simple: don't panic! Jessica Rimmer guides you through the ways in which the grades you get at LJMU will differ from those at Southern.  The expression of marks and grades differ greatly between the US and the UK. As percentage values don't carry the same grade weight on both sides of the Atlantic, marks in the UK are generally lower. Therefore, receiving marks in the 60 - 70 percentage range is no reason to despair, as this is considered the threshold for strong work in the UK. Another UK grading difference is the way in which results are characterised, as GPAs don't exist over here. Instead, students receive a mean mark for each year of their studies, and results are ultimately categorised into final degree classifications such as 'first class', 'upper second', 'lower second', 'third' etc. In order to aid your understanding of these seemingly incomprehensible differences in grading, please consult the 'UK/US grading system conversion chart'...
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Study Abroad at LJMU: Welcome to Liverpool!

Study Abroad at LJMU: Welcome to Liverpool!

Want to know how to spend your free time in Liverpool whilst studying at LJMU? Ask a local. Isobel Currie lets you in on her favourite places to visit... Liverpool is a vibrant city with so much to do and see. The city revolves around its nightlife, so there are options for different types of people and very different nights. I'd say my favourite is Seel Street, as the bars here have something for everyone - R&B, Soul, House and Pop music. Victoria Street offers some of the best clubs and gets very busy on a Saturday night. Liverpool is home to two huge football (soccer) teams, Liverpool FC and Everton FC. They both have stadiums in Anfield and Everton that you can take tours of or try their websites for game tickets. The derby in which the two teams play against each other really divides the city for the day. I'm sure I don't need to tell you that Liverpool is also the birthplace...
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Study Abroad at LJMU: The British Classroom

Study Abroad at LJMU: The British Classroom

LJMU English intern Isobel Currie tells you what to expect in classes at LJMU.  The average university day at LJMU differs massively from that at Southern. If you're studying on the English programme, for example, each of your modules will usually be timetabled for three hours per week. Usually, you'll start with a lecture for 50 minutes with 10 minutes break at the end. (Science programmes have a different schedule.) Lectures tend to be a single tutor speaking at the front of an auditorium to all the students registered on that module (this can be up to around 200 students). Generally students don't contribute to lectures, unless called upon by the tutor. Tutors also often make announcements before or after the session - regarding events, room changes etc.  Seminars are usually straight after lectures, and run for an hour and half to two hours, depending on the subject, the tutor and the contributions from you and your fellow classmates. They will feel more familiar to you, as they work in a...
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Study Abroad at LJMU: Trips from Liverpool

Study Abroad at LJMU: Trips from Liverpool

Now, our country is nowhere near the size of yours. This may have its downfalls, but it does mean that you can experience lots of different cities while you're studying at LJMU. From Liverpool you could easily visit Manchester and London on a day trip, and Edinburgh for a weekend; all are easily accessible by train from Liverpool's Lime Street Station. Manchester Trains between Liverpool and Manchester run frequently due to their close distance, usually once an hour. They can be as cheap as £6 for return tickets if you book in advance, but even booking on the day shouldn't be more than £8 each way. No-one fully understands the pricing systems of British train travel, but online booking is the most reliable way to get the cheapest tickets. Depending on where you live in the city, most stations will go to either of Manchester's main stations, Victoria or Piccadilly. For the town centre, I'd recommend using Victoria, as it's only a two minute walk from...
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Professor Glenda Norquay On Dangerous Women

Professor Glenda Norquay On Dangerous Women

While on a recent research fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, LJMU English Professor Glenda Norquay took part in the Dangerous Women Project. This initiative explores what it means to be ‘a dangerous women’. Each day, over the course of a year, a Dangerous Women Project post reflects on the various ways in which women might be understood as ‘dangerous’.  Contributions come from poets, playwrights, politicians, academics, artists, journalists and anyone who feels they can contribute to the theme. Glenda’s post, which went live on Thursday 8th September, is about the writer Annie S. Swan and the ways in which we might think about the ‘dangerous’ nature of her popular fiction:  ‘Annie S. Swan: making people cry’: click here to read it. You might want to follow the project on Twitter or read other posts from the project about writers, activists, scientists, politicians  - all kinds of women, from all over the world, doing interesting things!...
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‘Strength Through Variety’: LJMU’s In the Red Magazine

‘Strength Through Variety’: LJMU’s In the Red Magazine

Now in its fifteenth incarnation, In the Red Magazine champions Liverpool's Student Writing Community in an annual prose and poetry collection. The objective of this year's edition is to celebrate 'Strength Through Variety'. That's not just prose, poetry, comedy and music, but all forms of art so long as it's expressive and true to the person who created it. Poignant essays? Heart shattering poems? Hilarious haikus? Bring in a canvas painting! We'll display it for you. If it comes from a place inside and you feel you can share it with us, we'll humbly respect that honour by being your limbo champions, bending over backwards 'til our necks touch the ground to ensure you get the recognition you deserve and in turn making you a part of something every single one of us can be proud of. If you have any ideas for content regarding our events, talk to us. If you have unique skills beyond putting pen to paper and expressing yourself (and...
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Clearing: Come and study English with us!

Clearing: Come and study English with us!

If you think LJMU's English course might be for you, we still have a limited number of places available. Remember, though, that the Clearing process is very competitive. Here's our advice for securing a place on our course for September 2016: Make sure you've checked all the information on our entry requirements and the course itself via the LJMU website (and that you meet those requirements). Have a look at LJMU's Essential Guide to Clearing, here, to make sure you understand the process. Stay calm and be positive: we're a friendly bunch here at LJMU English. We make Clearing offers to candidates who are open and articulate, committed to their studies, who love reading and discussing ideas, and are aware of what LJMU English, the university, and the city have to offer - be ready to convince us that this means you! We make sure that all Clearing applicants talk to an academic - a lecturer on the English programme - and they'll want...
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Welcome Freshers 2016!

Welcome Freshers 2016!

Welcome to LJMU English! This tab along with the T.E.A tab are your first stops for all the information you'll need for your first few weeks. Beyond Freshers, us lot over at T.E.A (check out our actual faces under 'Student Interns' down the side there ----->) will be providing you with lots of helpful tips and insights into studying at LJMU. To get you started here's some very helpful stuff: Induction Week:     The Blackboard Community Site is where all of your course-related info and induction timetables will appear, and you'll receive details of how to gain access when you receive your official Welcome Pack from the University towards the end of August. Don't worry if you are struggling to understand Blackboard, we all are, it's a complicated beast and you will soon be able to just about tolerate it (that's as good as it gets with Blackboard, sorry). Once you are an enrolled, inducted, official LJMU student we can tell you all our deepest, darkest secrets (probably). By then you will undoubtedly...
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Welcome to T.E.A.

Welcome to T.E.A.

Hello and welcome to the official page of The English Appendage - or T.E.A. for short! We are a group of third year students here to help you with the transition to university. As our name suggests, we are an "appendage" to the English department and will be working alongside them to ensure that your first year goes as smoothly as possible, although we can't guarantee that there won't be a few bumps! We can offer that bit of extra help with the initial stress of getting your brain back into gear as getting started in university can be a bit full on. Whether you've come straight from sixth form, taken a year out to find yourself or have spent numerous years using your brain for literally anything else! We will be active on Twitter, Facebook, and right here posting academic hints and tips about numerous topics about how to get started on your reading and writing and how to survive university whilst...
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Reading English Module.

Reading English Module.

This is quite a fast-paced module, structured in three parts - focussing in turn on poetry (including 'V' by Tony Harrison - amazing, and Shakespeare's Sonnets), prose (Wuthering Heights - see T.E.A's separate post for this) and drama (Endgame by Samuel Beckett). This module, for me, felt quite different from the others, due to the varied material. Kate Walchester says: "The aim of 'Reading English' is to ease your transition into the undergraduate study of English Literature by introducing you to a wide range of texts from different periods, refreshing your knowledge of literary terms and techniques, and supporting you as you write your first research essay". This module may feel like a bit of a rollercoaster, unnerving at times, but it is exactly because of this feeling that the module is so enjoyable. It allows you the opportunity to explore the variations in literature. When it comes to choosing your modules for level 5, you will have a good idea of the different areas of study - for...
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Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

This is one of the texts you will study on the Reading English module. First of all let me just say that this novel is NOT a typical 'chick love story' (as one person put it in my seminar group). Heathcliff is far from the romantic hero, if he can be considered that at all! This is a far more complex story about greed, class, conflict and consequences. Please do not assume that you can watch a TV or film adaptation and know the story. The novel is far more complex, with intricately woven plot and character relationships. These things are never, in my opinion, portrayed correctly on screen and the novel's gothic atmosphere is usually either overlooked or over-done. I admit that Wuthering Heights is sometimes difficult to get into, I had to go back and start again, as I found I had not taken in the first few chapters, but perseverance with this novel is rewarding. There is so...
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Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

'Lo-lee-ta'. It is hard to pick a favourite book from the first year of the course, but when people ask me which book I enjoyed the most, Lolita always pops into my head first. Now I know that most will have heard of the book purely for its notoriety and controversial themes, but there is a lot more to this novel. Nabokov has an aesthetic quality hard to beat. Little descriptions that are both simple and stunning. In one line he can create an image that stays with you, 'She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock.' [In normal circumstances you will need to Harvard reference here]. Try not to be put off by the theme of the novel, although hard to stomach. Humbert Humbert is frequently shown as a monster or something strangely alien and grotesque. But the novel is not a sympathetic portrayal of a paedophile, rather a unique perspective on a...
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Lunch Poems by Frank O’Hara

Lunch Poems by Frank O’Hara

Lunch Poems was easily my favourite text of 1st year. I fell deeply in love with O'Hara and am married to his poems in my heart. I'm not a weirdo. Reading poetry is very different to reading a novel, and this often puts students off but if you stick with it the pay off is great and you'll never want to read anything but poetry again (except for what's on your reading list of course). The first thing to do with Lunch Poems is to give it a kiss because it's such a sexy little book. If you don't feel these urges to begin with then, trust me, you will by the time you're done (I reckon). Then just read through them all in one go. Don't worry about "getting" them or understanding all the references, because there are loads and you can look stuff up later, just read them. Get a feel for the language by reading aloud. Take your time, but not...
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Literature in Context

Literature in Context

This module aims to introduce you to methods of critical and contextual reading central to the English programme, and to the range of core skills essential to successful study at university level: at least that's the fancy way of explaining the module. Over the duration of the module you will analyse and compare literature from the 1950s and look at the cultural history of a novel, (it may sound boring but you will probably enjoy it, which is okay!). You will also be looking at how the novel was influenced by what was going on at the time. The pace of the module is set by the short story ‘The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner’ which is what your first assignment is on, but don't worry too much: it's only 600 words (the assignment, not the story). The texts that follow from the 1950s are Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes, Sam Selvon's The Lonely Londoners and Shelagh Delaney's A Taste of Honey...
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Digital Victorians Module

Digital Victorians Module

This is a new module running in the second semester (2017). Unfortunately I cannot restart my degree to take this module, or add it on to my modules for level 6! Not only does it look amazing but unbelievably helpful in introducing you to research skills early on in your degree. You will have the chance to research through digital sources whilst using social media and 'hands on' blogging to explore the past. If you plan to start reading for this module early, it is best to start with Sydney Padua's The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the Frist Computer. I have already added this to my 'for fun' reading list too! You will also look at Charles Dickens' Great Expectations.  This will be read on the module in its intended serial form (with week by week analysis), so you do not need to read this in advance (obviously you can, if you like). In this...
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Being a Commuting Student

Being a Commuting Student

Commuting to uni can sometimes be a challenge, especially if you live a bit of a distance away, and have a 9am lecture. It’s not rocket science – you have to get up early. However, you really need to make sure you give yourself enough time to eat and drink first. There is nothing worse than sitting in a lecture and your stomach rumbling! Thankfully if you are in a rush there is The Amazing Georgina – the toast lady in the student zone, who makes the best tea and toast ever . You will also need to get yourself sorted out with a train or bus pass. On a more personal note: It can be a worry that because you're not living in halls you won't meet people. This is not the case, there are ways you can get involved through the LSU, different societies you may be interested in and so on. The LSU have a lot of social events taking...
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Being a Mature Student

Being a Mature Student

I came to university after completing an Access course at college. I had done my A-Levels when I was younger, at which time I decided to take a year out to save money before university. That year turned into many as life took over and bills had to be paid. Many people have asked me, since returning to education, whether I regret not going to uni when I was younger. I can honestly say that I don’t. At 18 years old I was not confident or assertive in anyway, I was not sure what I wanted to do and certainly not prepared for the amount of work involved in university life – if you want to put your all into it. As a mature student I am not distracted by the nightlife (I did all of that in my 20’s) although I do enjoy meals out in Liverpool's many fantastic restaurants! I’m more aware of why I am here (at...
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Being a Student Parent

Being a Student Parent

I dropped out of university when I was 20 and moved back home to have my son. I knew it was the best option because my student life at the time consisted of getting up for a 9am lecture, pouring myself a mug of wine, and going back to bed until it was time to hit the clubs of Lancaster again (there are clubs in Lancaster, honest). Needless to say, becoming a parent changed my schedule a fair bit. For a while I was content with having  swapped booze for a balanced diet and night life for, well - still night life - but of a different sort. Then I started to wonder if I'd ever be able to go back to university. I wanted to, but I had a lot of doubts. Sometimes making it through the day without putting the telephone in the dishwasher or the kettle in the fridge seems like the greatest thing you'll ever achieve as a parent. It's a...
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Feeling daunted? Ineffectual? Inadequate? Don’t panic it’s all fine!

Feeling daunted? Ineffectual? Inadequate? Don’t panic it’s all fine!

My first two weeks at uni were spent walking aimlessly round, lost most of the time and hoping I could find someone I could follow - obviously not in a weird stalker way. I think everyone feels a little out of their depth at times, and you're not alone if you do, it's a common feeling. There have been moments when I have asked myself if I chose the right course, whether I was good enough to be on the course and generally whether I would do well. The truth is you're here on your own merit, you've earned your place: so you are in the right place. Self-doubt is something you simply have to get over in your own time. If you receive a mark on your assignment that you're disappointed with don't be disheartened, the tutors give constructive feedback that you can take on board and use to improve your work next time. The tutors are always happy to talk through...
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Student Discount

Student Discount

This is possibly the best thing about being a student (other than gaining a degree), as saving money is a student's prerogative. All you need is a bit of plastic, otherwise known as an LJMU card or NUS card, and you will be saving money here, there and everywhere! Getting your student discount in shops is fairly simple as you present your LJMU student card when you pay and you get 10% off your purchase, simple right? However, as you may notice on your new shiny LJMU card, there is no expiry date which means some shops may not accept it for student discount. Do not worry, we are here to help and have some inside information just for you... LJMU is a great university (as you know because you've chosen to go here) but you probably didn't know they are so great that they can get you a free NUS card, yes FREE! You apply for the card online...
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‘Doping in Sports’ – Teaching Experience

‘Doping in Sports’ – Teaching Experience

On 12th July 2016 a 'Doping in Sports' Conference was held in LJMU's Tom Reilly Building. This was part of a much larger project with LJMU's Endocrinology department, as well as the British Endocrine Society. This was my experience of our English-related part... Teaching is something I am considering doing in the future - that's why I took the Teaching 'strand' of the English Work Experience module during my second year. So, when I received an email from lecturer Dr Kate Walchester asking if I would be interested in a little bit more experience I jumped at the opportunity. However, as I settled and re-read the details (after confirming my desire to help out) I reeled at the title: Doping in Sports. Sports? As an elegantly sedentary literature student, sport, in general, is a long way down my list of thoughts for the day, in fact I think I go months without willingly thinking about sports at all. Yet, this was experience...
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Your Massive Reading List

Your Massive Reading List

Have you read the book for this week? Have you? Have you read all of the books IN THE WORLD? Because you need to - immediately! You are an English student now and the most important thing about being an English student is making sure that you never do anything other than read, read, read, and read some more. If you haven’t read and made extensive notes on every text on your reading list before the first week of teaching then you have already failed your degree and might as well throw the lot of them in the Mersey right now. Or maybe that’s not true. Maybe everything will be alright. Maybe you don’t need to read anything at all. Just sit back, make a cuppa, and spend the next 72 hours watching Netflix. Or maybe, just maybe, we can find a healthy and reasonable balance here. Getting to grips with the amount of reading you are required to do at degree...
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Seminar Survival

Seminar Survival

If you are a good student (and I know you are) then you'll have read your English Style Guide from cover to cover at least five times and will be very familiar with the section titled: 'Seminars and What to Do in Them'. If you haven't read it (Shock! Horror!), then go and read it now because it is very helpful and tells you everything you need to know about what to do in seminars. That said, I’m sure you want to know even more about what to do in seminars, which is why I’ve written even more about what to do in seminars. Being in a seminar is just like being at a house party, but you have to navigate it completely sober. That may sound awful, but at this party, learning is your drink of choice (stay with me), and if you take it one sip at a time your inhibitions will fade and you’ll soon be the life...
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The Library is Your Friend

The Library is Your Friend

The library really is your friend but like all friends you need to give it love and attention. It's just like that one friend you have who is clever and beautiful but also like, totally deep and complicated and if you don't make an effort to really understand, they'll walk off in a huff and hide the books you need. We all have a friend like that right? So here's some top tips about hanging out with your new mate and getting what you need. FINDING BOOKS WHEN YOU KNOW EXACTLY WHAT YOU WANT: This always seems like it's going to be so easy but we've all found ourselves wandering aimlessly up and down the aisles on the verge of tears because the book you need should be RIGHT HERE but it's not and it's all a conspiracy against you and you alone. The library services home page (https://www2.ljmu.ac.uk/lea/index.asp) is the starting point for all my tips so acquaint yourself with it now. Click 'Search Library Catalogue' under Quick...
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