Your (English) Career Calendar: To Dos for October

Your (English) Career Calendar: To Dos for October

Welcome to our brand new monthly featurette (now that's a neglected word) to keep you, wonderful LJMU English student, aware of all the Careers support available to you. Ah, autumn - season of mists and ... well, UCAS. This month is an important one for budding teachers, or those thinking about teaching as a potential option. You can find out more about the various graduate teacher training schemes with the brilliant LJMU ‘Train to Teach’ event, which takes place this year on the 12th October. For all the details, click here. If you have already decided on a teaching career then UCAS Teacher Training has just published the new Search date - 11 October 2016! This is the big moment when the search tool goes live, and will allow you to find training programmes starting in 2017. The first opportunity to make your selection - 'Apply 1' - is currently scheduled for 18th October 2016, although this may change, so keep checking the UCAS website here....
Read More
Study English Abroad in the USA

Study English Abroad in the USA

Since 2014, LJMU has been developing a unique transatlantic alliance with Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, Connecticut. At the centre of this agreement is the chance for LJMU and Southern students (as the latter are known) to experience life and study abroad, whether this is for a semester or a year. New Haven is perfectly located to give students the experience of an American college town whilst being in easy reach of cities like New York and Boston. LJMU English has long been dedicated to giving our students the opportunity to expand their experience by travelling abroad. Our 'Working in the USA' module was established over twenty years ago, and since then has supported the second year students who choose to take it in finding a vast array of both paid and unpaid work in the US. One of our External Examiners described the module as 'truly trailblazing'. You can read about how recent 'Working in the USA' students found...
Read More
Study Abroad at SCSU: English in America

Study Abroad at SCSU: English in America

Featured Image: 'Flag' by Jasper Johns, 1954, in the Museuem of Modern Art, NYC This summer sixteen lucky LJMU students had the opportunity to spend 3 weeks at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, USA, and I was one of them. Our two universities have set up a 'transatlantic alliance' to open up possibilities for study abroad for their students. SCSU laid on a full and exciting programme of activities across Connecticut for us, and these are my English-related highlights! Libraries I Saw Obviously the first thing I needed to know as an English student abroad was, where is the nearest library? Southern's Hilton .C. Buley Library on campus was my first stop. Don't tell the Aldham Robarts, but it was a pretty impressive building, smack bang in the middle of the beautiful New Haven campus (the sunshine helped too, I guess). The library boasts some very fancy Tiffany stained-glass windows and, most importantly, its own Starbucks, not to mention an array of spectacular and comfortable chairs...
Read More
Study Abroad at SCSU: Exploring the Campus

Study Abroad at SCSU: Exploring the Campus

Signed up to study at SCSU? Isobel Currie will be your campus tour guide today... Southern Connecticut State University, or just 'Southern' to its students and staff, was founded in 1893 as a teaching college, and in 1937 it became the New Haven State Teachers' College. In the spring of 1953 it moved from Howe Street to its present 168-acre site on Crescent Street, and began a period of huge growth and diversification. Southern expanded into general education in 1959, and then became Southern Connecticut State College. Today they have approximately 11,500 full- and part-time undergraduate and graduate students. Now of course, the best way to get acquainted with the Southern campus is to show up and have a walk around. Pictures can give you an idea, but it's so much better to go and discover everything when you get there. Southern invests a lot in its campus, which has recently acquired a new School of Business, three new parking garages, a new residence hall complex,...
Read More
Study Abroad at SCSU: Staying Connected in the US

Study Abroad at SCSU: Staying Connected in the US

While the appeal of avoiding group messages and emails can be alluring, if you're going away from home for over a week or two, it's not going to happen. Your family and friends will want to know if you're ok and receive regular updates on your travels. It is important to stay connected to people at home, especially if you feel a bit anxious or home-sick on arrival. Hearing their voices or seeing their faces will instantly make you feel better. So the good news is that you don't have to spend huge amounts of money while you're at SCSU to stay in touch with the folks at home. For the majority of communication techniques you of course need wifi or internet data, but Southern have free wifi on campus so this shouldn't be an issue if you have your phone or tablet. It's a really good idea to prepare your parents and friends (but especially your parents!) for long distance communication, by practicing Skype,...
Read More
Study Abroad at SCSU: New Haven’s (Serious) Pizza

Study Abroad at SCSU: New Haven’s (Serious) Pizza

You say Pizza, they say Apizza…: The foundation of the food scene in New Haven is Apizza: I'm told this is the local dialect of saying pizza. I'm not quite sure what the difference is, but you're probably okay just calling it as it is. Everybody will tell you that there are 4 pizza places you cannot leave New Haven without trying: Modern: Thin base, big crust. Large is huge. Try a white pie with clams ( it's a New Haven tradition). Less wow-factor, more traditional. Definitely feels like a classic spot to come with a group of friends and share a couple of large pizza's. Bar: The crust is fairly non-existent in the best way possible. It's all basic flavours and less dough. Order large and they come in squares to share, definitely big enough to fill the most rumbling stomach. This place offers mashed potato on pizza. Depending on who you are that could either sound disgusting or like a...
Read More
LJMU, Meet SCSU: Working in the USA Internship Project

LJMU, Meet SCSU: Working in the USA Internship Project

On 12th July, three LJMU English students on the second year module 'Working in the USA' - Isobel Currie, Rupert French and Jessica Rimmer - travelled to New Haven, Connecticut to begin a three week internship project at Southern Connecticut State University. Part-funded by LJMU's Curriculum Enhancement Project and the International Office, they are going to produce a range of online resources for students considering taking advantage of the 'transatlantic alliance' between LJMU and SCSU (or 'Southern' as it's known to its students and staff) that should allow hundreds of students to experience life and study on the opposite Atlantic coast in the next few years. Alice Ferrebe, the Head of English, who arranged the internships and travelled out with the interns, said, 'This is a really exciting new development - for LJMU, in its alliance with Southern, and for our long-running "Working in the USA" module. We hope that in the future lots of students who have always dreamed of...
Read More
Working in the USA: Lizzie Offiler

Working in the USA: Lizzie Offiler

Lizzie Offiler was one of around 40 students who chose to take LJMU English's Working in the USA module in her second year with us. Here's her account of her experiences working and living in America this summer. On Friday 13th May 2016, I flew out to Boston Logan International Airport to begin my travels in America. I was greeted by my Aunt who I was to stay with for the entirety of the time I was working there. I have a lot of family in America and as a result, I have been over to visit my family more times than I can remember, but working there enlightened me to an entirely different experience to what I have been used to in the past. I worked at two placements whilst in America, the first in an elementary school, which is the same age group as primary school. My second placement was in the following high school, that the children in the elementary school will...
Read More
The new LJMU English Academic Journal is here!

The new LJMU English Academic Journal is here!

It's Autumn again: time for a new academic year, a new start, and, of course, a new diary. The latest edition of our world-renowned English Academic Journal is ready and waiting, fallen from its tree like a ripe fruit... (ok, enough). So if you're studying English at LJMU, please make sure you pick up your very own free copy at Induction. As always, the EAJ is full of crucial information about the English Department, and about how to navigate smoothly and serenely through student life in Liverpool and beyond. The journal has been designed by students for students (with a little bit of help from Jo Croft), and it includes literary 'quotes of the week' as well as spaces for you to write out your timetable, reading lists, PDP sessions etc. This year's edition has extra note pages (as requested by you), and even has a special section for your own literary compositions. There are QR codes linked to this website, and - most importantly...
Read More
LJMU English PhD Joseph Thorne on his role in ‘Liverpool’s Wild(e) Poet’ Exhibition

LJMU English PhD Joseph Thorne on his role in ‘Liverpool’s Wild(e) Poet’ Exhibition

Here LJMU English PhD Joseph Thorne talks about his involvement with Liverpool Central Library's current exhibition:  When I first applied to LJMU (back in the distant past of 2014), I was promised involvement with an exhibition on the late-Victorian Liverpool poet, Richard Le Gallienne. I’d come across Le Gallienne in my wider reading, but he was always a very marginal character. He was one of Oscar Wilde’s hangers on and then, following the Wilde trials, broke from Decadence and faded into well-deserved obscurity. And that was all there was to it. Or so I thought. When I started working my way through the extensive Le Gallienne collection, housed in the Liverpool Central Library, I was forced to re-evaluate Richard Le Gallienne. For those of you who know little about Le Gallienne, a brief biography is a good starting point. He was born as Richard Gallienne in 1866 to John and Jane Gallienne. His father, who worked at the Birkenhead Brewery, hoped that...
Read More
Professor Glenda Norquay On Dangerous Women

Professor Glenda Norquay On Dangerous Women

While on a recent research fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, LJMU English Professor Glenda Norquay took part in the Dangerous Women Project. This initiative explores what it means to be ‘a dangerous women’. Each day, over the course of a year, a Dangerous Women Project post reflects on the various ways in which women might be understood as ‘dangerous’.  Contributions come from poets, playwrights, politicians, academics, artists, journalists and anyone who feels they can contribute to the theme. Glenda’s post, which went live on Thursday 8th September, is about the writer Annie S. Swan and the ways in which we might think about the ‘dangerous’ nature of her popular fiction:  ‘Annie S. Swan: making people cry’: click here to read it. You might want to follow the project on Twitter or read other posts from the project about writers, activists, scientists, politicians  - all kinds of women, from all over the world, doing interesting things!...
Read More
‘Strength Through Variety’: LJMU’s In the Red Magazine

‘Strength Through Variety’: LJMU’s In the Red Magazine

Now in its fifteenth incarnation, In the Red Magazine champions Liverpool's Student Writing Community in an annual prose and poetry collection. The objective of this year's edition is to celebrate 'Strength Through Variety'. That's not just prose, poetry, comedy and music, but all forms of art so long as it's expressive and true to the person who created it. Poignant essays? Heart shattering poems? Hilarious haikus? Bring in a canvas painting! We'll display it for you. If it comes from a place inside and you feel you can share it with us, we'll humbly respect that honour by being your limbo champions, bending over backwards 'til our necks touch the ground to ensure you get the recognition you deserve and in turn making you a part of something every single one of us can be proud of. If you have any ideas for content regarding our events, talk to us. If you have unique skills beyond putting pen to paper and expressing yourself (and...
Read More
Liverpool’s Wild(e) Poet: Richard Le Gallienne Exhibition at Central Library

Liverpool’s Wild(e) Poet: Richard Le Gallienne Exhibition at Central Library

  Those of you interested in Oscar Wilde (who isn’t?), in literary Liverpool or in the 1890s might like to visit the current exhibition at the beautiful Hornby Library in Liverpool Central Library from 5 August–31 October 2016. This free exhibition celebrates the life and 150th anniversary of Richard Le Gallienne, Birkenhead boy, aesthete, poet and critic, who was inspired to lead a literary life after hearing Wilde lecture in Liverpool. You can read the Guardian review of the exhibition here. For LJMU English final year students, this would be sure to get you in the mood for our Level 6 module ‘Vamps and Villains’. LJMU PhD student, Joseph Thorne, has been working as a research assistant on the exhibition and will be blogging soon for us about his experiences curating and working in the archives.  ...
Read More
Shrinking Violets: Radio 4’s Book of the Week

Shrinking Violets: Radio 4’s Book of the Week

LJMU English's Professor Joe Moran's latest book, Shrinking Violets, will be Book of the Week on Radio 4 next week, starting on Monday 29th August. Joe's 'Field Guide to Shyness' will be read by Nigel Planer. If you miss an episode, you'll be able to listen again here. Can't wait until Monday? You can also read Joe's fantastic essay previewing the book on the Guardian website here.  ...
Read More
Marginal Irish Modernisms: International Conference at LJMU English 8-9 September 2016

Marginal Irish Modernisms: International Conference at LJMU English 8-9 September 2016

On Thursday 8th and Friday 9th September 2016 the Department of English at LJMU will host an international conference on the subject of Marginal Irish Modernisms. The conference will focus on reconsidering the meaning and scope of Irish modernism throughout the twentieth century and down to the present. The keynote speakers are Professor Joseph Bristow of the University of California who will be talking about Oscar Wilde Sir Roger Casement, and Dr Tina O’Toole of the University of Limerick, who will lecture on cosmopolitan Irishness in the fiction of George Egerton. Besides Britain and Ireland, delegates will be attending from France, Germany and the United States. The Principal Co-ordinator of the network Professor Gerry Smyth said: ‘The department of English here at LJMU has strengths in many of the areas encompassed by this conference. It’s fantastic to have an event like this here in Liverpool, and to be at the forefront of exciting developments in the field of modernist studies.’ This event is part...
Read More
Liverpool Travel Seminar, Saturday 24th September 2016

Liverpool Travel Seminar, Saturday 24th September 2016

The tenth annual Liverpool Travel Seminar will be held at Blackburne House, Liverpool, on Saturday 24 September 2016. The Liverpool Travel Seminar is a collaborative and interdisciplinary research forum launched jointly by Liverpool Hope University, the University of Liverpool, and Liverpool John Moores University in 2007. This year’s event is arranged in association with the Arts and Humanities Research Council ‘Translating Cultures’ theme, and brings together researchers linked to AHRC-funded projects with members of the Network on Travel Writing of the Far North to discuss questions of travel and place. Speakers include Professor Karina Lykke Grand (Aarhus University, Denmark) Professor Margaret Topping (Queen’s University Belfast) and Professor Carol Tully (Bangor University). The seminar is organised by Professor Charles Forsdick (University of Liverpool), Dr. Zoe Kinsley (Liverpool Hope University) and Dr. Kate Walchester (Liverpool John Moores University). For further details contact Kate Walchester (K.A.Walchester@ljmu.ac.uk). You can reserve a place here. ...
Read More
Clearing: Come and study English with us!

Clearing: Come and study English with us!

If you think LJMU's English course might be for you, we still have a limited number of places available. Remember, though, that the Clearing process is very competitive. Here's our advice for securing a place on our course for September 2016: Make sure you've checked all the information on our entry requirements and the course itself via the LJMU website (and that you meet those requirements). Have a look at LJMU's Essential Guide to Clearing, here, to make sure you understand the process. Stay calm and be positive: we're a friendly bunch here at LJMU English. We make Clearing offers to candidates who are open and articulate, committed to their studies, who love reading and discussing ideas, and are aware of what LJMU English, the university, and the city have to offer - be ready to convince us that this means you! We make sure that all Clearing applicants talk to an academic - a lecturer on the English programme - and they'll want...
Read More
Welcome Freshers 2016!

Welcome Freshers 2016!

Welcome to LJMU English! This tab along with the T.E.A tab are your first stops for all the information you'll need for your first few weeks. Beyond Freshers, us lot over at T.E.A (check out our actual faces under 'Student Interns' down the side there ----->) will be providing you with lots of helpful tips and insights into studying at LJMU. To get you started here's some very helpful stuff: Induction Week:     The Blackboard Community Site is where all of your course-related info and induction timetables will appear, and you'll receive details of how to gain access when you receive your official Welcome Pack from the University towards the end of August. Don't worry if you are struggling to understand Blackboard, we all are, it's a complicated beast and you will soon be able to just about tolerate it (that's as good as it gets with Blackboard, sorry). Once you are an enrolled, inducted, official LJMU student we can tell you all our deepest, darkest secrets (probably). By then you will undoubtedly...
Read More
Welcome to T.E.A.

Welcome to T.E.A.

Hello and welcome to the official page of The English Appendage - or T.E.A. for short! We are a group of third year students here to help you with the transition to university. As our name suggests, we are an "appendage" to the English department and will be working alongside them to ensure that your first year goes as smoothly as possible, although we can't guarantee that there won't be a few bumps! We can offer that bit of extra help with the initial stress of getting your brain back into gear as getting started in university can be a bit full on. Whether you've come straight from sixth form, taken a year out to find yourself or have spent numerous years using your brain for literally anything else! We will be active on Twitter, Facebook, and right here posting academic hints and tips about numerous topics about how to get started on your reading and writing and how to survive university whilst...
Read More
An Introduction to World, Time and Text

An Introduction to World, Time and Text

World, Time and Text is an expansive module, incorporating texts from across the centuries so you are bound to enjoy something and if not everything. You'll be exposed to such a plethora of literature that you're at least learning a lesson in diversifying from your normal reading list. Starting with Paradise Lost you're dropped somewhere near the deep end but fear not, we've already compiled a list of hints and tips with how best to stay afloat and enjoy the epic poetry of John Milton! World, Time and Text focuses on intertextuality, how literature across generations is linked and what questions this brings about authorship. What you learn about intertextuality in this module will be applicable for all modules across the course and brings about all sorts of debates about who retains the authority on a piece of writing. From Paradise Lost you will look at Northern Lights by Phillip Pullman, edging towards the shallow end, unfortunately filled with a talking polar bear refusing to give up any...
Read More
Paradise Lost by John Milton

Paradise Lost by John Milton

Paradise Lost: As an opening text to studying English at University, Paradise Lost by John Milton can seem a daunting prospect for a few reasons. It is an epic poem about Satan post-fall from Heaven and the fall of Man, as soon as you open it you'll see why it can get tricky. Here are a few tips to get you started: It will be the first book you study for World, Time and Text, so make sure you read Book 1 as early as possible! It is important to get a head start, especially because the chances are you will need to read it about five times before you feel like you are beginning to understand it. Try reading it aloud: The problem with big words and long sentences is that the brain can begin to trip over itself a tad. Reading Paradise Lost to yourself aloud (In the biblical style of an early 90s Samuel. L. Jackson) will give you a sense of rhythm to the epic poem, and help with your...
Read More
Reading English Module.

Reading English Module.

This is quite a fast-paced module, structured in three parts - focussing in turn on poetry (including 'V' by Tony Harrison - amazing, and Shakespeare's Sonnets), prose (Wuthering Heights - see T.E.A's separate post for this) and drama (Endgame by Samuel Beckett). This module, for me, felt quite different from the others, due to the varied material. Kate Walchester says: "The aim of 'Reading English' is to ease your transition into the undergraduate study of English Literature by introducing you to a wide range of texts from different periods, refreshing your knowledge of literary terms and techniques, and supporting you as you write your first research essay". This module may feel like a bit of a rollercoaster, unnerving at times, but it is exactly because of this feeling that the module is so enjoyable. It allows you the opportunity to explore the variations in literature. When it comes to choosing your modules for level 5, you will have a good idea of the different areas of study - for...
Read More
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

This is one of the texts you will study on the Reading English module. First of all let me just say that this novel is NOT a typical 'chick love story' (as one person put it in my seminar group). Heathcliff is far from the romantic hero, if he can be considered that at all! This is a far more complex story about greed, class, conflict and consequences. Please do not assume that you can watch a TV or film adaptation and know the story. The novel is far more complex, with intricately woven plot and character relationships. These things are never, in my opinion, portrayed correctly on screen and the novel's gothic atmosphere is usually either overlooked or over-done. I admit that Wuthering Heights is sometimes difficult to get into, I had to go back and start again, as I found I had not taken in the first few chapters, but perseverance with this novel is rewarding. There is so...
Read More
American Classics Module

American Classics Module

This module will introduce you to American literature and ask you to consider its wider significance in American culture. As the title would suggest the idea of the literary classic plays a key part but rather than simply accept that some texts are 'classics' and others aren't, the module prompts you to consider what it is that makes a classic. What social and cultural ideas get reinforced when certain texts are named classics? The first text you'll read is Solomon Northup's 1853 text Twelve Years a Slave.  Two tips here: 1) don't think you'll be able to get away with just watching the film! and 2) buy the (cheap) Wordsworth Edition of the text which includes module leader Dr Colin Harrison's introduction to the text. Studying a slave narrative to begin a module on American literature will kick off all of those discussions about classics, how, for example, does American literary history change if considered amongst its most important works are...
Read More
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

'Lo-lee-ta'. It is hard to pick a favourite book from the first year of the course, but when people ask me which book I enjoyed the most, Lolita always pops into my head first. Now I know that most will have heard of the book purely for its notoriety and controversial themes, but there is a lot more to this novel. Nabokov has an aesthetic quality hard to beat. Little descriptions that are both simple and stunning. In one line he can create an image that stays with you, 'She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock.' [In normal circumstances you will need to Harvard reference here]. Try not to be put off by the theme of the novel, although hard to stomach. Humbert Humbert is frequently shown as a monster or something strangely alien and grotesque. But the novel is not a sympathetic portrayal of a paedophile, rather a unique perspective on a...
Read More
Literature in Context

Literature in Context

This module aims to introduce you to methods of critical and contextual reading central to the English programme, and to the range of core skills essential to successful study at university level: at least that's the fancy way of explaining the module. Over the duration of the module you will analyse and compare literature from the 1950s and look at the cultural history of a novel, (it may sound boring but you will probably enjoy it, which is okay!). You will also be looking at how the novel was influenced by what was going on at the time. The pace of the module is set by the short story ‘The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner’ which is what your first assignment is on, but don't worry too much: it's only 600 words (the assignment, not the story). The texts that follow from the 1950s are Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes, Sam Selvon's The Lonely Londoners and Shelagh Delaney's A Taste of Honey...
Read More
The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

'The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner' by Alan Sillitoe: As the first text you’ll study for Literature in Context you will read this short story of a young working class man and his journey, both literally and metaphorically. The book raises questions about the class system, dialect and questioning our idea of morality. Here are some hints and tips as to how to best approach this short story: It is provided in the module booklet: Hurrah, save 60p from Amazon Market Place  and spend it on toast in the morning. Any freebies (I say freebies, £9000, but who’s splitting hairs?) like this are made for highlighting and underlining, go nuts in the lecture by scrawling notes over it to help you with writing your first essay in Literature in Context. It will be the first piece you have to write about at University: Despite being an introductory essay of 600 words there will be a ripple of fear through the room at the prospect...
Read More
Literary and Cultural Theory

Literary and Cultural Theory

This module will introduce you to the main areas of literary and cultural theory and teach you how to apply them to literary texts as well as teaching you to think critically about just about everything: films, TV, current events, family dinners, you think of it and by the end of this module you'll be able to crticially analyse it. You'll learn about Psychoanalysis, Marxism, Postcolonial Theory, and Feminism. You'll have two sessions on each approach, which will mean you'll get to grips with the main concepts of the theory, and then work on applying them 'in practice'. The assessment for this module is in two parts, a presentation and an essay. For the presentation you'll be asked to prepare, in small groups, about 10 minutes on one of the theories, demonstrating how you would apply it to a text, film, music video, song, etc, of your choice. For example, you might do a feminist reading of a Shakespeare play, or take a...
Read More
Being a Commuting Student

Being a Commuting Student

Commuting to uni can sometimes be a challenge, especially if you live a bit of a distance away, and have a 9am lecture. It’s not rocket science – you have to get up early. However, you really need to make sure you give yourself enough time to eat and drink first. There is nothing worse than sitting in a lecture and your stomach rumbling! Thankfully if you are in a rush there is The Amazing Georgina – the toast lady in the student zone, who makes the best tea and toast ever . You will also need to get yourself sorted out with a train or bus pass. On a more personal note: It can be a worry that because you're not living in halls you won't meet people. This is not the case, there are ways you can get involved through the LSU, different societies you may be interested in and so on. The LSU have a lot of social events taking...
Read More
Being a Mature Student

Being a Mature Student

I came to university after completing an Access course at college. I had done my A-Levels when I was younger, at which time I decided to take a year out to save money before university. That year turned into many as life took over and bills had to be paid. Many people have asked me, since returning to education, whether I regret not going to uni when I was younger. I can honestly say that I don’t. At 18 years old I was not confident or assertive in anyway, I was not sure what I wanted to do and certainly not prepared for the amount of work involved in university life – if you want to put your all into it. As a mature student I am not distracted by the nightlife (I did all of that in my 20’s) although I do enjoy meals out in Liverpool's many fantastic restaurants! I’m more aware of why I am here (at...
Read More
Being a Student Parent

Being a Student Parent

I dropped out of university when I was 20 and moved back home to have my son. I knew it was the best option because my student life at the time consisted of getting up for a 9am lecture, pouring myself a mug of wine, and going back to bed until it was time to hit the clubs of Lancaster again (there are clubs in Lancaster, honest). Needless to say, becoming a parent changed my schedule a fair bit. For a while I was content with having  swapped booze for a balanced diet and night life for, well - still night life - but of a different sort. Then I started to wonder if I'd ever be able to go back to university. I wanted to, but I had a lot of doubts. Sometimes making it through the day without putting the telephone in the dishwasher or the kettle in the fridge seems like the greatest thing you'll ever achieve as a parent. It's a...
Read More
Liverpool For Literature Lovers

Liverpool For Literature Lovers

If you can manage to put down your books and get out of bed every now and again, there is a lot for a literature lover to do in this here Liverpool. Here are some good things: The Bluecoat: Located here, The Bluecoat is the city's hotspot for contemporary arts of all kinds. If you check out their events page and tick 'Literature' it will bring up a list of exciting literary happenings. Often they are free, or charge a very small fee. If you are a poetry fan like me then look out for their (usually free) poetry readings and groups. If you are in Liverpool this month then there is an exciting sounding Literary Walks event called Visiting Victorians on Sunday 24th July, 2-4pm. The event "evokes 19th century Liverpool and discovers how writers explored the struggles and triumphs of the town that Dickens called the ‘Copperfield stronghold'"- click the link to book tickets. The events are updated every few weeks so keep checking back to see what's on. There is...
Read More
Feeling daunted? Ineffectual? Inadequate? Don’t panic it’s all fine!

Feeling daunted? Ineffectual? Inadequate? Don’t panic it’s all fine!

My first two weeks at uni were spent walking aimlessly round, lost most of the time and hoping I could find someone I could follow - obviously not in a weird stalker way. I think everyone feels a little out of their depth at times, and you're not alone if you do, it's a common feeling. There have been moments when I have asked myself if I chose the right course, whether I was good enough to be on the course and generally whether I would do well. The truth is you're here on your own merit, you've earned your place: so you are in the right place. Self-doubt is something you simply have to get over in your own time. If you receive a mark on your assignment that you're disappointed with don't be disheartened, the tutors give constructive feedback that you can take on board and use to improve your work next time. The tutors are always happy to talk through...
Read More
Student Discount

Student Discount

This is possibly the best thing about being a student (other than gaining a degree), as saving money is a student's prerogative. All you need is a bit of plastic, otherwise known as an LJMU card or NUS card, and you will be saving money here, there and everywhere! Getting your student discount in shops is fairly simple as you present your LJMU student card when you pay and you get 10% off your purchase, simple right? However, as you may notice on your new shiny LJMU card, there is no expiry date which means some shops may not accept it for student discount. Do not worry, we are here to help and have some inside information just for you... LJMU is a great university (as you know because you've chosen to go here) but you probably didn't know they are so great that they can get you a free NUS card, yes FREE! You apply for the card online...
Read More
How To Dress and Accessorise Like A Literature Student: Our ESSENTIAL Picks

How To Dress and Accessorise Like A Literature Student: Our ESSENTIAL Picks

‘No, I haven’t done the reading for this week’ t-shirt. Dark sunglasses for avoiding eye contact with tutors in seminars when you haven’t done the reading for that week. Knitwear. Lots of knitwear. Chunky knits with pockets big enough to put books in. Fancy bookmarks. If you turn up to uni with sub-par bookmarks you’ll regret it for the rest of your life. This is the big leagues. A large, practical bag. Fashion has no place here, OK? You’ll probably always need to carry at least 15 books at any given time….. Lots of pendant necklaces with literary quotes on them. Everyone’s wearing ‘em. Anything you can find that has a literary quote on it. Just go mad and cover yourself in words, this is who you are now. A pile of books to arrange by your side at all times: 1 dog-eared and very stained to prove you love the classics like a proper literature student, 1 annotated...
Read More