‘Employment, Mobility and Intercultural Communication’: Kate Walchester’s Keynote Lecture in Norway

‘Employment, Mobility and Intercultural Communication’: Kate Walchester’s Keynote Lecture in Norway

On 4 February 2016, LJMU English's Kate Walchester travelled to Østfold University College in Halden, Norway to give a Keynote Lecture to open the Second ENTICE International Interdisciplinary Conference. The (irresistible) acronym ENTICE stands for 'East-North Travel and Intercultural Communication in Europe', a project funded by EEA and Norway Grants, awarded to encourage pan-European collaborations.  Kate’s lecture, which discussed the travel writing of Mary Wollstonecraft, Lady Di Beauclerk and Mrs. Aubrey le Blond was titled ‘Employment, Mobility and Intercultural Communication in British Travelogues from the long Nineteenth Century’ and comes from her research for a monograph, Travelling Servants; Mobility and Employment in British Travel Writing 1750- 1850. Kate is shown in the photo with organisers Dr. Eva Lambertson and Dr. Jutta Eschenbach from the English Department at Østfold University College.  ...
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Bella Adams’s Pre-Show Talk at Liverpool Playhouse: A Raisin in the Sun

Bella Adams’s Pre-Show Talk at Liverpool Playhouse: A Raisin in the Sun

On Thursday 3rd March, LJMU English's Bella Adams will be giving a pre-show talk on Lorraine Hansberry's ground-breaking 1959 play A Raisin in the Sun, which is on at the Liverpool Playhouse from 2nd-5th March. James Baldwin claimed of the play that, ‘Never before, in the entire history of theatre, has so much of the truth of black people’s lives been seen on the stage'. Bella's talk will explore the cultural and political context of the play, and you can get tickets to hear her speak here. Bella said, 'My talk will focus on Lorraine Hansberry’s varied political interests, the critical reception of the play, the Chicago Southside setting and housing segregation. This wasn't a play I knew well before I heard it was coming to the Playhouse, and reading and researching it has been fascinating. In fact, I'm thinking of adding it to the reading list for my Race in America module next year.' If you're studying that module, or fancy seeing a fascinating...
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Sam Saunders

Sam Saunders

I'm a PhD student in the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to starting my PhD I studied for a dual-honours degree in English and History at Bangor University, North Wales, before coming to LJMU in September 2014 and completing the MRes (Master of Research) degree in English Literature, passing with distinction. My MRes thesis explored the relationships between gender and character in Victorian detective fiction and how the gender of characters affected the progress of detective narratives across the nineteenth century. My current research interests lie in the study of Victorian sensation, crime and detective fiction, as well as mid-to-late Victorian print culture and the way that these two genres intersect with each other. My PhD research engages with the role of Victorian periodicals between 1861 and 1887 in public perceptions of the police force, detectives and crime. It explores the ways that the public perceived the police through these periodicals, and how this affected the construction of...
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‘A Friend in Rose’: LJMU Drama & English Student at Luminous Landscapes

‘A Friend in Rose’: LJMU Drama & English Student at Luminous Landscapes

You know when you're wandering around Liverpool's Festival Gardens in the dark, clutching the hand of your grumpy five-year-old? Perhaps you don't. But imagine if you were, and you suddenly recognised one of the amazing people involved in the Lantern Company's Luminous Landscapes event as one of your students! Here, Siofra McKeon-Carter, a final year Drama and English student, answers my star-struck questions after a really memorable event: How did you get involved with the Lantern Company? I got involved through their student placements as I had worked with one of their team before on NCS The Challenge. (By that way, that's also a fab organisation for students to work for over the summer, and you can find out about them here.) What did you do as part of Luminous Landscapes?  I was part of the team working the puppet Rose, aka the 'old lady, keeper of the lakes'. Rose may be elderly, but she's also around ten feet tall. How did you prepare for your performances?  We actually met Rose about two...
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LJMU English’s Deaglán Ó Donghaile to give Public Talk on Irish Fenianism

LJMU English’s Deaglán Ó Donghaile to give Public Talk on Irish Fenianism

As part of the Liverpool celebrations marking the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin, LJMU English lecturer, Dr Deaglán Ó Donghaile, will give a public talk on the Irish Fenian revolutionary, Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa, at the LJMU's John Foster Building on 26th February at 5pm. Described by the rebellion’s leader, Patrick Pearse, as being 'incapable of compromise', O’Donovan Rossa was one of the key figures of nineteenth-century Irish republicanism.  Such was his importance to the physical force tradition that his funeral was used as the ideological launching ground for the Easter Rising. Interned in Ireland, and then later imprisoned in England for high treason, he was tortured and held in isolation for resisting prison authorities.  Upon his release he rejoined the Fenian movement and advocated the use of arms to remove the British presence from Ireland. Drawing on research that he has conducted at the Huntington Library, the New York Public Library, the Trinity College Library in Dublin and at the...
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LJMU English Masters student to speak at ‘Cityscapes’ Conference

LJMU English Masters student to speak at ‘Cityscapes’ Conference

LJMU English's MRes student Charlotte Neely has had her paper accepted by the 'Cityscapes: Media Textualities and Urban Visions' conference to be held at York St John University on 23rd April. The paper is entitled 'Re-mapping Possibilities: The Immigrant Child's Experience of New York's Urban Ghetto', and Charlotte will be speaking about Henry Roth's 1934 novel Call it Sleep and how it can be illuminated by the theory and practice of psychogeography; the study of the influence of geographical locale on the mind and behaviour. This newly emerging discipline places particular emphasis upon playfulness and drifting within the urban environment, and she will draw upon its ideas to reinterpret the movements of Roth's child protagonist David Schearl through New York's Lower East Side during the years leading up to the Great Depression. Charlotte's paper will argue that, despite facing impoverished conditions and ethnic discrimination, David locates spaces of play that transgress boundaries and disrupt mechanisms of power. As the protagonist makes his impromptu journey through the city,...
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Writing Working-Class Womens’ Lives: LJMU English Students Speaking at Oxford University on International Women’s Day

Writing Working-Class Womens’ Lives: LJMU English Students Speaking at Oxford University on International Women’s Day

Students on the Level 6 LJMU English module 'Writing Lives' have been invited to share their research on working-class women’s autobiography at the Gender, Women and Culture seminar at Oxford University on the 8th March 2016. Soraya Nas and Catriona Parkinson, two of the module's student researchers, will be talking about their author blogs. Helen Rogers, who designed and runs this innovative module, will explain how LJMU English students are contributing to a public history project to create a digital archive of working-class autobiography in Britain, from the 17th to the 21st century. She will also discuss some of our preliminary findings about working-class women’s life-writing, based on our research on memoirs from the Burnett Archive of Working Class Autobiographies. Helen said 'We all feel particularly honoured that on International Women’s Day we will be involved in celebrating women’s lives, writing and history'. Soraya Nas will be talking about Elizabeth Rignall, born in Yorkshire in 1894. In her author blog, Soraya shows how Elizabeth’s memoir, All So Long Ago, ‘brings to light the...
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Masculinity and the Metropolis: LJMU English Student to give paper at University of Kent Conference

Masculinity and the Metropolis: LJMU English Student to give paper at University of Kent Conference

Lois Walker, a postgraduate student on LJMU English's Masters by Research programme, has had her conference paper proposal accepted for the 'Masculinity and the Metropolis' conference at the University of Kent in April 2016. The interdisciplinary conference, which spans two days, will include scholars of literature, art history and film. Lois's paper is entitled 'The Myth of Gay "Golden Age" New York', and will focus upon two novels from the period - John Rechy’s Rushes (1979) and Andrew Holleran’s Dancer from the Dance (1978). She seeks to challenge the romanticised ideal of an urban 'safe space' by exposing ways in which male homosexual experience was forced into the de-industrialised and derelict dark spaces of New York city such as the piers and the waterfront bars. Her chosen writers express within their novels a duality within gay metropolitan life and illustrate several conflicts between the individual and the community, the homosexual male and the city, and the discourses of private and public life within the urban. Lois graduated...
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Professor Glenda Norquay at the Scottish Poetry Society

Professor Glenda Norquay at the Scottish Poetry Society

This Thursday, 4th February 2016, LJMU English's Professor Glenda Norquay will be giving a talk on Scottish women's poetry at the Scottish Poetry Library in Edinburgh. Many of the strongest voices in Scottish poetry today are those of women, yet only 40 years ago, successful female poets were marginal figures. Glenda, who is currently taking up a prestigious Visiting Research Fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, will discuss the emergence of women writers from the 1970s onwards. In the second part of the evening, poet Liz Lochhead shares her memories of the Scottish poetry scene in the 1970s, in conversation with Colin Waters. Tickets for the event 'From Renaissance to Referendum: Women's Voices in Modern Scottish Poetry', which are free, can be booked here. ...
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English MRes Residential 2016: Gladstone’s Library

English MRes Residential 2016: Gladstone’s Library

Every year, LJMU English's Masters by Research students attend a residential with their supervisors and some of the department's PhD students to talk, read, and reflect on their studies on the programme so far. Here, Edward Dafnis gives his account of our (wonderful) trip in January 2016: An hour’s drive from LJMU is Gladstone’s Library in Hawarden, North Wales. Completed in 1902 to house William Gladstone’s personal collection of over 20, 000 books, periodicals and journals – all read by the man himself and with an estimated 11, 000 containing annotations, the library now houses 250, 000 texts and promised to be a reflective place of study and discussion. Articles by Walter Benjemin, Jorge Luis Borges and Alberto Manguel plus a short story by Alice Munro started the afternoon discussions before a tour of the spectacular library. Nestled amongst the rows of leather bound tomes were armchairs and simple wooden tables where people sat and read and worked in silence. Despite...
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Empire and After Go to Artist and Empire

Empire and After Go to Artist and Empire

On Wednesday 20 January Dr Gerry Smyth and Dr Filippo Menozzi took nine second-year students to London to see an exhibition entitled  Artist and Empire at Tate Britain. Taking advantage of LJMU's Corporate Partnership with the Tate organisation, the students - who are all taking a module entitled Empire and After - saw a range or materials (paintings, sculpture, games and other artefacts) relating to the controversial role of the British Empire worldwide. One student, Katie Taylor, said: 'The highlight of the exhibition was Andrew Gilbert’s mixed media installation British Infantry Advance on Jerusalem, 4th of July, 1879. It shows a tableau of British soldiers, imagining them as defeated and displayed as curios adorned with an array of bizarre accessories such as high-heeled leather boots, white leather handbags, shards of broken mirror, numerous dangling teabags and a carrot driven through with nails. The effect was striking among the imperial paintings of the British Empire and helped me to question the way representations of non-British cultures often...
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Liverpool Postcolonial Reading Group: Concerning Violence

Liverpool Postcolonial Reading Group: Concerning Violence

On Thursday 4th February the Liverpool Postcolonial Reading Group, which was founded by postgraduate students in LJMU's School of Humanities and Social Science, will be showing Göran Olsson’s Concerning Violence (2014). This documentary about imperialism and decolonisation across the African continent, is based on Franz Fanon’s 1961 The Wretched of the Earth and narrated by Lauryn Hill. The reviewer for Variety noted: ‘Göran Hugo Olsson doesn’t make documentaries so much as incendiary devices, diving deep into Swedish film archives for vintage clips that have sat like so much undetonated ordnance all these years.’ The session will begin at 5pm with a short introduction to the film, and there will be time for discussion afterwards. You can see the film's official trailer here. If you're working with postcolonial issues at any of Liverpool's four universities, and you fancy coming along, please contact the group via email liverpoolpostcolonial@gmail.com or Twitter: @Lpoolpostcolonial...
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LJMU PhD Scholarship Scheme: Now Open for Applications

LJMU PhD Scholarship Scheme: Now Open for Applications

As part of its ongoing commitment to extend and diversify the PhD community at LJMU, the university have just announced this year's round of scholarships. These include both fully-funded and fees-only opportunities. A number of LJMU English's current postgraduate students were able to work with us because of their success in this scheme. So if you are considering undertaking a doctorate in English, and think your work might fit well within our Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History, please get in touch with a member of the team as soon as possible to discuss your ideas. You can read about our research interests by clicking on individual staff and student pictures to the right of the screen. All details of the scheme are available here: https://www.ljmu.ac.uk/research/phd-scholarships and the deadline for applications is 18th March 2016.  ...
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Liverpool 2016: City of … English Homework?

Liverpool 2016: City of … English Homework?

If you're an LJMU English student, it's likely that you've recently been offered a free trip to some sort of cultural happening in Liverpool to further inspire you in your studies. Level 4 students on 'World, Time and Text' went to see rapper Testament remixing William Blake's poetry back in November. Last month Level 5 'Shakespeare' students saw The Winter's Tale at the Liverpool Playhouse, and students on the Level 6 modules 'Vamps and Villains' and 'Our House' have also been to the Playhouse to see The Haunting of Hill House.  We're lucky to live in a place that gives us so many opportunities to extend the thinking we do and the discussions we have in class. So why not make it one of your New Year's resolutions to make the most of even more of the cultural opportunities our amazing city has to offer? We're not saying it'll guarantee better marks, but well... it can't hurt. And do remember that all LJMU students get amazing discounts with the University's...
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The Winter’s Tale: LJMU English Fieldtrip

The Winter’s Tale: LJMU English Fieldtrip

LJMU Level 5 Shakespeare student, Hugh Adam, writes about the 18th November production of The Winter's Tale. The Winter’s Tale Performed at the Liverpool Playhouse, the Northern Broadsides’ production of The Winter’s Tale captures all the vital emotional elements of the text (jealousy, betrayal, abandonment, acceptance, comedy, redemption), while adding a modern twist sure to please all theatre goers, not just Shakespeare enthusiasts. Beginning in Sicily, transposed from the time of its writing to New Year’s Eve 1999, The Winter’s Tale opens with the celebrations of old friends Leontes, the King of Sicily, and Polixenes, the King of Bohemia. In accordance with the play’s complexity of tone, the celebrations are bittersweet for Polixenes, who longs to return to Bohemia and his family. His eventual decision to remain in Sicily (convinced by Leontes’ wife, Hermione) gives the insecure Leontes grounds to suppose an affair between the two, leading the King of Sicily (and those around him) into a vicious, jealousy-fuelled turmoil. The first three acts...
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North-West Print Culture Research Network Meeting

North-West Print Culture Research Network Meeting

Wednesday 28th October 2015 saw the first meeting of the North West Print Culture Research Network. Created in association with the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP), the Network is an exciting new collaboration between several North West institutions designed to discuss different research projects and in the future produce collaborative research opportunities in the field of print culture and periodical research.   Brian Maidment (LJMU): Reading Victorian Periodical Illustration - A Workshop This first session was hosted by Edge Hill University and featured a wide variety of workshops, talks and papers from academics working and researching in the field of print culture from across several institutions in the North West, including Edge Hill University, Liverpool John Moores University and Manchester Metropolitan University. After a brief introduction provided by Bob Nicholson of Edge Hill University, the first session of the day was presented by Professor Brian Maidment (LJMU), and was split into two halves. Firstly, an introduction to the ‘Origins of the Popular Press’...
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Wuthering Heights: Reading English Trip to Haworth

Wuthering Heights: Reading English Trip to Haworth

Paul McFerran is an LJMU English and Creative Writing student at Level 4.  I did not know what to expect when we arrived in Haworth. I suppose I had envisioned a dark and dreary village that had not left the 1800s similar to the landscape of the novel Wuthering Heights. Despite these wild imaginings, Haworth had actually progressed with the rest of the world and I was honestly surprised to feel a familiarity with the place, not because I had been before, but because it was somewhat reminiscent of the countryside I had become accustomed to back home in Ireland. From the bus that brought us to our destination, we were guided towards the local church where we were offered some background to the Brontë family and the lives they led. Emily's mother had died of cancer when she was only three, and her younger sisters Maria and Elizabeth died not long after. To learn that Emily had lost so many family members at...
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Marginal Irish Modernisms in the USA

Marginal Irish Modernisms in the USA

Dr Deaglán Ó Donghaile of LJMU English spent three weeks of September in the United States promoting the project Marginal Irish Modernisms which secured a grant of over £30,000 from the prestigious Arts and Humanities Research Council. This is a new scholarly network that was established by Deaglán and LJMU English's Dr Gerry Smyth (the project's leader), in order to explore the work of marginalised or critically-neglected Irish modernist writers. Other writers who whose work will form part of the project include Maeve Brennan, J. W. Dunne, Lord Dunsany, Lennox Robinson and John Rutherford. Deaglán met with modernism scholars at the University of California, Los Angeles, at Arizona State University in Phoenix  and at the Mapping Yeats Symposium, held in Kansas City, Missouri.  At Arizona State University, he spoke to staff and students from the Barrett Honors College on the writings of Ernie O’Malley, an Irish republican author whose memoirs offer an aesthetically experimental reflection on the Irish War of Independence. At UCLA, Deaglán also had the...
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Sort Your Life Out! (With LJMU English)

Sort Your Life Out! (With LJMU English)

Hot off the press, the 2015-16 edition of The English Academic Journal is now ready. All students on the English programme, whether single or combined honours, are entitled to a free copy, so please look out for the rather beautiful spiral bound journals (with a green cover this year), and pick one up from your personal tutor. Student interns from the English programme have been working feverishly over the summer to design a journal for all our students. Fuelled only by jammie dodgers [other jam-filled biscuits are available] and cups of tea [other beverages are... oh, you know this], the team have put loads of thought and time into designing this year’s edition. The journal is intended to serve both as a useful diary /planner  and as a repository of incredible wisdom about (almost) all aspects of life as a student  studying English at LJMU. It contains loads of information about your University and about Liverpool – places to go, people...
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Teaching the British 1950s in China, 2015

Teaching the British 1950s in China, 2015

Each year, Shanghai University run an 'International Semester' in June, when students completing their first year of study have the chance to pick short courses across a range of disciplines that are designed and taught by academics from outside China. In June this year, I was lucky enough to be one of those 60 or so teachers myself, and offered a course based upon material both from my last book, Good, Brave Causes: Literature of the 1950s, and my experience on teaching one of LJMU English's first year modules, Literature in Context. I stayed on campus - which, as SU has just under 40,000 students, is like a town within the city, with canteens, sports facilities, and supermarkets, and dormitories sleeping four undergraduates to a room. My class consisted of 32 students studying a wide variety of subjects, from engineering to... well, English. Though all of the students had studied the English language since primary school, not all of them had practice in...
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Singing a Song of Victorian Poverty

Singing a Song of Victorian Poverty

In a summer break largely consumed by traditional conference duties (Victorian Periodicals in Ghent in July, more periodicals in Stockholm in September) it has been a relief to step out a little from normal scholarly events. In late July, on the strength of a long standing interest in writing by labouring class men and women in the nineteenth century, I was invited by a radio producer based in Manchester to contribute to a programme on the popular literature of the industrial revolution to be broadcast on Radio 4. The great attraction, apart from the fascination of seeing how something like this is put together, was that the presenter of the programme is Eliza Carthy, one of Britain’s leading traditional singers. I had heard Eliza and her father Martin sing and play together a few weeks previously, and I was very interested to meet her. The programme was put together in Chetham’s Library in Manchester, a library based in beautiful medieval buildings...
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Congratulations LJMU English Graduates!

Congratulations LJMU English Graduates!

Monday wasn't the sunniest day, but the Graduation of our 'Class of 2015' was still a brilliant occasion. Congratulations to all the single- and joint-honours students who have studied with us over the last three (or so) years: we were delighted that so many of you came back to the John Foster building for a drink and a strawberry or two to celebrate. Please do keep in touch and let us know all the amazing things you get up to, either via individual tutors or via this website. As you can see, the gallery below is somewhat dominated by pictures of your tutors looking daft impressive in their robes. If you'd like to add some of your own pictures of the festivities to the LJMU English site (yourself looking daft, or daft, or just plain gorgeous in your robe, for instance), please just email them to Alice Ferrebe (High resolution, medium size, if possible!) with a sentence confirming your permission. We wish all our graduates...
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PhD Success: Judge David Lynch

PhD Success: Judge David Lynch

Judge David Lynch, an Honorary Fellow of LJMU, gained his PhD with flying colours in May 2015. His thesis on ‘The Role of the Circuit Courts in the Development of Federal Justice’ makes a significant contribution to literature on the development of early American law and was passed without emendations. When he retired from the Bench David embarked on an MRes in Literature and Cultural History and completed his Masters in 2011. Rather than relaxing into retirement, he then began working towards his Doctorate. His Director of Studies was Dr Colin Harrison, whose own research is on North American cultural history and his supervisory team included Professor Glenda Norquay (English) and Dr Carlo Panara (Reader in Law). With the encouragement of the External Examiner, Professor Penny Darbyshire, Kingston Law School, David (now 75) is now planning to produce a book out of his research....
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Scotland & The Caribbean, c.1740-1833: Michael Morris’s New Book

Scotland & The Caribbean, c.1740-1833: Michael Morris’s New Book

Since joining LJMU English in June 2014, Dr Michael Morris has completed his first book, which participates in the modern recovery of the memory of the long-forgotten relationship between Scotland and the Caribbean. Drawing on theoretical paradigms of world literature and transnationalism, it argues that Caribbean slavery profoundly shaped Scotland’s economic, social and cultural development, and draws out the implications for current debates on Scotland’s national narratives of identity. Eighteenth- to nineteenth-century Scottish writers are re-examined in this new light. Michael's book explores the ways that discourses of 'improvement' in both Scotland and the Caribbean are mediated by the modes of pastoral and georgic which struggle to explain and contain the labour conditions of agricultural labourers, both free and enslaved. The ambivalent relationship of Scottish writers, including Robert Burns, to questions around abolition allows fresh perspectives on the era. Furthermore, Michael considers the origins of a hybrid Scottish-Creole identity through two nineteenth-century figures - Robert Wedderburn and Mary Seacole. The final chapter moves forward to consider the...
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Teaching English in Thailand: Naomi Sykes

Teaching English in Thailand: Naomi Sykes

After a placement in Malta teaching English last year, arranged through LJMU's Erasmus office with the help of Jayne Kerwin, Level 6 English and Creative Writing student Naomi Sykes couldn't wait to work abroad again. And now, once all her assignments are handed in, she's off to Thailand to teach in Nakhon Ratchasima province. Naomi says: 'Jayne knew how much I thrived over there teaching English so she recommended applying for this placement in Thailand too. I had to send in an online application including a cover letter and a C.V and there was a very long waiting process for the verdict. It all seems so close now though, as I have booked my flights, sorted out my DBS check, the ball is rolling and the dream is becoming a reality! I will be 2/3 hours from Bangkok the capital which is perfect and I am super excited to do what I love and get some adventure in there too! I was thrilled to find...
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Research Seminar: Dr Fionualla Dillane, ‘New Old Formalism, Old New Historicism, Victorian Periodicals and the Problem of Genre’

Research Seminar: Dr Fionualla Dillane, ‘New Old Formalism, Old New Historicism, Victorian Periodicals and the Problem of Genre’

10th March, 2015. After a warm welcome to LJMU from Professor Brian Maidment, Dr Fionualla Dillane from University College Dublin outlined the crux of her discussion. Is the study of periodicals under threat from the ‘new old formalism’ that encourages the researcher to think of the periodical as a ‘training ground’ for writers approaching established forms. By broaching the muddy waters of genre using the return to formalism, genre, Fionualla suggested, is a methodological tool and a conceptual frame. The study of periodicals has always been interdisciplinary due to the diverse field and contents of periodicals. Fionualla unpacked the concept of new formalism, giving rich analysis of the pivotal texts and argued that a return to formalism privileges the literary, which, by extension, deprivileges other texts defined as lacking literary merit and designated as craft. This is a conservative approach which Fioualla successfully argued is ‘turning back’. Fionualla argued that the study of periodicals is still at the stage of description rather than...
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The Judas Kiss: Treason and Betrayal in Six Modern Irish Novels

The Judas Kiss: Treason and Betrayal in Six Modern Irish Novels

Gerry Smyth's new book argues that modern Irish history encompasses a deep-seated fear of betrayal, and that this fear has been especially prevalent since the revolutionary period at the outset of the twentieth century. The author goes on to argue that the novel is the literary form most apt for the exploration of betrayal in its social, political and psychological dimensions. The significance of this thesis comes into focus in terms of a number of recent developments – most notably, the economic downturn (and the political and civic betrayals implicated therein) and revelations of the Catholic Church’s failure in its pastoral mission. As many observers note, such developments have brought the language of betrayal to the forefront of contemporary Irish life. This book offers a powerful analysis of modern Irish history as regarded from the perspective of some its most incisive minds, including James Joyce, Liam O’Flaherty, Elizabeth Bowen, Francis Stuart, Eugene McCabe and Anne Enright. ...
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Love’s Labours Lost: Live in Liverpool

Love’s Labours Lost: Live in Liverpool

On the 11th February 2015 a number of students attended a live streaming of Shakespeare’s Love’s Labours Lost in a Royal Shakespeare Company production coming to us in FACT Liverpool from Stratford-Upon-Avon. Set in an Edwardian country house, this was an excellent production of one of the lesser-known plays. The visit was arranged for Level 5 students taking the Shakespeare module but other students and postgraduates also came along. The play (and its comedy) really came to life although, sitting in a cinema, it was difficult to know whether or not to applaud along with the enthusiastic audience in Stratford! We did, however, have the advantage of taking in food and drink. Second-year student Andrew Stevens-Davies commented: ‘Having not attended a Shakespeare performance before, I did not know what to expect from a cinematic viewing of a live performance. That being said, my expectations were immediately surpassed. As an English student studying Shakespeare I quite often find myself getting frustrated with the...
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‘He heard the world more than he saw it’: Dr Gerry Smyth launches James Joyce’s Chamber Music Resource

‘He heard the world more than he saw it’: Dr Gerry Smyth launches James Joyce’s Chamber Music Resource

In 2011 Dr Gerry Smyth of LJMU English set to music the thirty-six lyrics that comprise Chamber Music, published by the Irish author James Joyce in 1907. Although Joyce is one of the most studied authors of the modern era, his poetry remains relatively unknown. The following year, Gerry recorded this material for a CD entitled James Joyce’s Chamber Music: New ‘Folkish’ Settings of the Thirty-Six Lyrics, and since then he has performed material from the album on numerous occasions, including events in Belgium, France, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden. During the same period, Dr Smyth commenced work on a web-based learning resource, hosted by LJMU, which features a wide range of textual and video materials relating to Joyce’s original collection, and to the new musical version. This is an on-going project which will in time be fully integrated into LJMU English's teaching and research profile, and you can access it here, and via the 'Links and Resources' section of our site. The website was launched at an event in...
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Dr Jon Cranfield and the Holmesian Phenomenon

Dr Jon Cranfield and the Holmesian Phenomenon

Jon Cranfield's new book, co-edited with Tom Ue, received an excellent review in the Guardian this week. Sherlock Holmes is part of a series called Fan Phenomena which explores how enduring cultural icons are continually reinvented by their fans. The essays cover a wide range of these creative reinterpretations, from Steampunk iPad apps to Shakespeare and including, of course, the most recent television reappearance, played by Benedict Cumberbatch. Jon's own chapter in the book is entitled 'Sherlock Holmes: Fan Culture and Fan Letters'. Look out for a copy arriving soon in the Aldham Robarts Library....
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Shelf Lives: Wednesday, 15 October 2014

Shelf Lives: Wednesday, 15 October 2014

LJMU English will be running the next in the series of Shelf Lives talks on the top floor of Liverpool City Library on Wednesday 15th October 2014, from 3PM to 4.30PM. Jon Cranfield will talk about Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902), followed by Deaglán Ó Donghaile on Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent (1907), and Elspeth Graham on Izaak Walton's The Compleat Angler (1653). We hope to see you there.! ...
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This conference changed my life (or my thesis, at least)

This conference changed my life (or my thesis, at least)

I recently got back from a four day geekend that was an international conference on science fiction held in London, as the 72nd WorldCon, an event so big that countries and cities bid for it in coming years (like the Olympics, but instead of athletes you get nerds) – indeed, it was held in a venue so big that it had two – TWO – train stations. Count them… Two. The conference was on diversity in science fiction, from its conception and inception to form and content, including text and hypertext, passive and interactive narratives, and, specifically for me, narratives that operated outside of the dominant paradigm of the straight white male. As I was struggling with a dissertation on the (feminist) posthuman in Iain M Banks novels, Alice Ferrebe threw over a CFP email and I went for it with all the verve and vitriol I had. And they accepted my abstract. And then I panicked. But I had my mentors, the staff,...
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How We Used To Live: LJMU English Hosts Northern Film Premiere

How We Used To Live: LJMU English Hosts Northern Film Premiere

First shown at the 2013 London Film Festival, How We Used To Live is a poetic collage-history of London, setting colour footage from the BFI National Archive to the hazy, beautiful music of Saint Etienne. Produced by the filmmaking collective of the band with writer Travis Elborough and director Paul Kelly, it looks back at Britain from the 1950s to the 1980s, with some scenes lost to contemporary Britain, but some still profoundly resonant. The film will be screened on Thursday, 14th October 2014 at 5.30pm in John Foster 121, and Travis Elborough will answer questions afterwards. You can watch a trailer of the film here. ...
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‘The best academics’: Helen Rogers in the THE

‘The best academics’: Helen Rogers in the THE

Dr Helen Rogers has been named in the Times Higher Education as an academic making exemplary use of blogging in her research. In the article 'Twitter and Blogs are Not Add-ons to Research', published on 28th August 2014, Tim Hitchcock, professor of digital history at the University of Sussex, praised Helen's Conviction blog, which shares ideas and excerpts from her forthcoming book Conviction: Stories from a Nineteenth-Century Prison. Professor Hitchcock claims that the most impressive thing about Helen's blog (and her career more widely) 'is that there is no waste – what starts as a blog, ends as an academic output, and an output with a ready-made audience, eager to cite it'. Last year Helen received a Teaching Grant from the Higher Education Authority to develop her innovative approach to fostering collaborative student research in two of LJMU English's undergraduate modules. Visit 'Prison Voices' and 'Writing Lives' to see what her students have achieved. You can also find out more about both...
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Chloé Holland

Chloé Holland

I am a PhD student at the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to my PhD, I graduated from the University of Salford with a first-class BA (Hons) in English Literature, and from the University of Chester’s Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture MA, for which I achieved a distinction. My BA and MA dissertations focussed on the popular sensation fiction writer Ellen Wood (1814-1887), author of the bestselling East Lynne (1861). My main research interests are Victorian popular fiction, periodicals, and women’s writing, all ofwhich feature in my PhD thesis, which explores the professional identities with which Ellen Wood successfully negotiated the saturated Victorian literary marketplace. There is a wealth of Wood’s fiction as well as her professional strategies as an editor and writer that have yet to receive sufficient academic attention. I hope to contribute to the emerging research into the connections between women writers, periodicals, and professional identities by establishing Wood as a significant figure in terms of self-promotion,...
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