Digital Victorians Module

Digital Victorians Module

This is a new module running in the second semester (2017). Unfortunately I cannot restart my degree to take this module, or add it on to my modules for level 6! Not only does it look amazing but unbelievably helpful in introducing you to research skills early on in your degree. You will have the chance to research through digital sources whilst using social media and 'hands on' blogging to explore the past. If you plan to start reading for this module early, it is best to start with Sydney Padua's The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the Frist Computer. I have already added this to my 'for fun' reading list too! You will also look at Charles Dickens' Great Expectations.  This will be read on the module in its intended serial form (with week by week analysis), so you do not need to read this in advance (obviously you can, if you like). In this...
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‘Doping in Sports’ – Teaching Experience

‘Doping in Sports’ – Teaching Experience

On 12th July 2016 a 'Doping in Sports' Conference was held in LJMU's Tom Reilly Building. This was part of a much larger project with LJMU's Endocrinology department, as well as the British Endocrine Society. This was my experience of our English-related part... Teaching is something I am considering doing in the future - that's why I took the Teaching 'strand' of the English Work Experience module during my second year. So, when I received an email from lecturer Dr Kate Walchester asking if I would be interested in a little bit more experience I jumped at the opportunity. However, as I settled and re-read the details (after confirming my desire to help out) I reeled at the title: Doping in Sports. Sports? As an elegantly sedentary literature student, sport, in general, is a long way down my list of thoughts for the day, in fact I think I go months without willingly thinking about sports at all. Yet, this was experience...
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Erasmus Opportunities: Naples, anyone?

Erasmus Opportunities: Naples, anyone?

Dr Filippo Menozzi, our (Italian) English lecturer, has been working to establish a new Erasmus opportunity for future students on the programme (like you, if you're a Fresher in 2016!). This will allow future level 5 students (who enter their second year from 2017/2018 onwards) the chance to spend a term studying in Naples at the University of Naples L'Orientale! I'm so jealous I almost don't want to write this post... The programme (in Naples! Did I mention that?) will be taught in English and you will choose modules from their existing English literature programme. You will be assessed by them, which will obviously go toward your degree in England (unfortunately you will have to return). The assessment styles may differ slightly from those at home, but this will be clarified before you go. As students you will receive help with regard to your accommodation and travel plans, and you'll receive plenty of other information to help you whilst you're there. This opportunity will enable students to...
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Plagiarism: A Guide

Plagiarism: A Guide

During your university career you will on plenty of occasions be reminded what a terrible thing it is to commit so-called 'Academic Misconduct'. These warnings may seem dramatic, your tutor may even include pictures of skulls in their powerpoint presentation in a desperate attempt to deter you, but there is a point to all of this. That point being: plagiarism is a bad idea, don't do it. Your English Style Guide tells you, 'The University defines Academic Misconduct as 'any case of deliberate, premeditated cheating, collusion, plagiarism or falsification of information, in an attempt to deceive and gain an unfair advantage in assessment''. And here are a couple of basic tips to help you on your merry way to not being dragged to trial in Cheater's Court (you actually will have to go to a panel hearing if you plagiarise, beware!): Learn to Reference: Have your English Style Guide beside you every time you start an assignment. Read it, love it, learn its...
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Literary Connecticut: The Mark Twain and Harriet Beecher Stowe houses

Literary Connecticut: The Mark Twain and Harriet Beecher Stowe houses

Located in Hartford, the Mark Twain and Harriet Beecher Stowe houses are a must-see for any literature students visiting Connecticut. Twain and his wife Olivia commissioned the New York architect Edward Tuckerman Potter to design their elaborate home in 1873, and they moved in during September 1874. The house was as fancy and huge as we were promised it would be. Taking photographs inside was strictly prohibited (sorry to disappoint). So too was touching anything except the handrail on the stairs which, as it happened, was so low that it didn't feel safe to lean down and hold onto, so I declined to take part in that sensory experience of Twain's former home. The house has been restored to resemble the decadence that Twain decided it was necessary for his family to live in. The walls of the entrance hall were hand stencilled with intricate silver patterns, the house was full of fancy paintings, the woodwork and the handrail on the stairs were gorgeously...
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