The Two Gentlemen of Verona: Trip to the Everyman Theatre, 12th October 2016

The Two Gentlemen of Verona: Trip to the Everyman Theatre, 12th October 2016

Our second year Shakespeare module had a change in its reading list this year when LJMU English lecturer Rebecca Bailey discovered that the Everyman was collaborating with Shakespeare's Globe on an October production of The Two Gentlemen of Verona. On Monday night over 50 students and staff from the department attended the show, which styles Verona as what director Nick Bagnall calls the 'cardigan clad world' of the swinging Sixties. The following day, Bagnall, whom the Guardian called 'the most mind-altering of Shakespearean directors' and Emma Whiteley, the Everyman's Learning Manager, came along to the module for a Q&A. Shakespeare students made the most of this opportunity with a range of questions. Many were fascinated with the music - a major facet of the production - asking how it had been composed, how it was used to separate the play's different 'spaces' (Verona, Milan and the forest), and how on earth the cast members were so talented that they all acted, danced, sang and played...
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Empire and After Go to Artist and Empire

Empire and After Go to Artist and Empire

On Wednesday 20 January Dr Gerry Smyth and Dr Filippo Menozzi took nine second-year students to London to see an exhibition entitled  Artist and Empire at Tate Britain. Taking advantage of LJMU's Corporate Partnership with the Tate organisation, the students - who are all taking a module entitled Empire and After - saw a range or materials (paintings, sculpture, games and other artefacts) relating to the controversial role of the British Empire worldwide. One student, Katie Taylor, said: 'The highlight of the exhibition was Andrew Gilbert’s mixed media installation British Infantry Advance on Jerusalem, 4th of July, 1879. It shows a tableau of British soldiers, imagining them as defeated and displayed as curios adorned with an array of bizarre accessories such as high-heeled leather boots, white leather handbags, shards of broken mirror, numerous dangling teabags and a carrot driven through with nails. The effect was striking among the imperial paintings of the British Empire and helped me to question the way representations of non-British cultures often...
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