Nadine Muller Wins Heritage Lottery Funding for War Widows’ Stories

Nadine Muller Wins Heritage Lottery Funding for War Widows’ Stories

LJMU English's Dr Nadine Muller has secured funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund for her new project War Widows' Stories. Reflecting on how the idea for this venture came about, and what the project will achieve, Nadine says: My first book, The Widow: A Literary & Cultural History, is due to be published by the end of the year, and while I’m proud of the monograph, it very much feels like a book alone won't do this topic justice. The stories I uncovered are filled with injustice, prejudice, and hardship in many different forms. Yet very few people seem to be aware of the challenges widowhood has presented for women in Britain over the past two centuries on economic, psychological, and social levels, and even fewer are aware that to this very day there are battles left to be fought. Of course one group of women is very much aware of these issues, and that is widows themselves. I often go on about the benefits of blogging...
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Postgraduate Research Seminar (2013)

Postgraduate Research Seminar (2013)

This year’s postgraduate research seminar, led by the MRes students of the Research Centre, brought together an exciting mix of themes, genres, and periods. As is so often the case, it was a pleasant surprise seeing how well our postgraduates handled their nerves in presenting their work-in-progress to a room full of well-wishing – yet in the speakers’ eyes probably slightly terrifying – academics. The challenge of being first on the afternoon’s programme was one Liam Mushrow handled competently with a paper entitled “Pullman and Literary Realism: The Sally Lockhart Mysteries”. Focusing on The Lockhart Quartet (1985-1994) and the novels’ move from being marketed first as detective fiction and later as children’s literature, Mushrow’s talk provided a discussion of Philip Pullman representations of violence. More specifically, Mushrow’s careful analysis was concerned with Pullman’s descriptions of violence as a means of achieving narrative realism, raising wider questions about the novels’ claims to “historical authenticity” and their moral and educational responsibilities to young...
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