LJMU English PhD Joseph Thorne on his role in ‘Liverpool’s Wild(e) Poet’ Exhibition

LJMU English PhD Joseph Thorne on his role in ‘Liverpool’s Wild(e) Poet’ Exhibition

Here LJMU English PhD Joseph Thorne talks about his involvement with Liverpool Central Library's current exhibition:  When I first applied to LJMU (back in the distant past of 2014), I was promised involvement with an exhibition on the late-Victorian Liverpool poet, Richard Le Gallienne. I’d come across Le Gallienne in my wider reading, but he was always a very marginal character. He was one of Oscar Wilde’s hangers on and then, following the Wilde trials, broke from Decadence and faded into well-deserved obscurity. And that was all there was to it. Or so I thought. When I started working my way through the extensive Le Gallienne collection, housed in the Liverpool Central Library, I was forced to re-evaluate Richard Le Gallienne. For those of you who know little about Le Gallienne, a brief biography is a good starting point. He was born as Richard Gallienne in 1866 to John and Jane Gallienne. His father, who worked at the Birkenhead Brewery, hoped that...
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PhD Jennie O’Reilly to give conference paper to the American Folklore Society

PhD Jennie O’Reilly to give conference paper to the American Folklore Society

LJMU English Phd student Jennie O'Reilly has just received support funding from both LJMU and the American Folklore Society to deliver a conference paper in the US. Here she describes the research underlying her proposal... Back in June of this year I received an email from the American Folklore Society informing me that my paper had been accepted at this year’s Joint Annual Meeting with the International Society for Folk Narrative Research – in Miami! What an incredible location for a conference... Addressing the theme of the conference on ‘Unfinished Stories’, my paper will focus on two ethnographies: Mules and Men by Zora Neale Hurston and Harry Hyatt’s Hoodoo Conjuration Witchcraft Rootwork, both undertaken during the 1930s. ‘Florida is a place that draws people, white people from all the world, and Negroes from every Southern state surely and some from the North and West’ claimed Zora Neale Hurston in Mules and Men. When asked ‘where [did she] want to go to collect...
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Joseph Thorne

Joseph Thorne

I am a PhD researcher at LJMU English, in receipt of the Fully-funded PhD Scholarship. Before coming to Liverpool, I did my undergraduate degree in English Language and Literature at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where I did a special author paper on Oscar Wilde. I then completed an MA in English Literature in my native Cardiff. My dissertation, supervised by Dr Anthony Mandal, was on the Decadent tendency to define criminality as a form of sainthood. In this project I explored everything from Victorian inner-city cartography to the nature of sin in the proto-weird fiction of Arthur Machen. This gave me a good basis for my current project: a re-reading of the fin-de-siècle illustrator Aubrey Beardsley. While most criticism treats him as a fairly isolated, prickly character, my study will pay particular attention to his place in the social networks of the 1890s. I have given papers at the ‘Medieval Myths and British Identities’ conference (Cardiff University, 18/09/2015) and the ‘Fin de...
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Sam Saunders

Sam Saunders

I'm a PhD student in the Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History. Prior to starting my PhD I studied for a dual-honours degree in English and History at Bangor University, North Wales, before coming to LJMU in September 2014 and completing the MRes (Master of Research) degree in English Literature, passing with distinction. My MRes thesis explored the relationships between gender and character in Victorian detective fiction and how the gender of characters affected the progress of detective narratives across the nineteenth century. My current research interests lie in the study of Victorian sensation, crime and detective fiction, as well as mid-to-late Victorian print culture and the way that these two genres intersect with each other. My PhD research engages with the role of Victorian periodicals between 1861 and 1887 in public perceptions of the police force, detectives and crime. It explores the ways that the public perceived the police through these periodicals, and how this affected the construction of...
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LJMU PhD Scholarship Scheme: Now Open for Applications

LJMU PhD Scholarship Scheme: Now Open for Applications

As part of its ongoing commitment to extend and diversify the PhD community at LJMU, the university have just announced this year's round of scholarships. These include both fully-funded and fees-only opportunities. A number of LJMU English's current postgraduate students were able to work with us because of their success in this scheme. So if you are considering undertaking a doctorate in English, and think your work might fit well within our Research Centre for Literature and Cultural History, please get in touch with a member of the team as soon as possible to discuss your ideas. You can read about our research interests by clicking on individual staff and student pictures to the right of the screen. All details of the scheme are available here: https://www.ljmu.ac.uk/research/phd-scholarships and the deadline for applications is 18th March 2016.  ...
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Graduate Teaching Assistantships

Graduate Teaching Assistantships

The Faculty of Arts, Professional and Social Studies at Liverpool John Moores University is offering up to 10 full time Graduate Teaching / Research Assistant Studentships in a range of disciplines to start in October 2014. This studentship scheme offers a valuable opportunity to study for a PhD while teaching in subjects broadly related to your PhD research. The studentship covers full tuition fees and a bursary of £13,863 for three years, based on successful PhD progression. GTAs work with academic staff in a range of teaching, learning and assessment activities to support student learning for up to 180 hours in each academic year. These activities include supporting lectures, leading seminars, providing tutorial support, demonstrating in practical classes, marking student assessments and exam invigilation. GTAs will undertake a programme of teaching and learning skills development during the first year, and will be encouraged to attend a range of researcher development sessions in line with the Vitae Researcher Development Framework throughout their...
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