The English Team Go Mad (For Research) in North Wales

The English Team Go Mad (For Research) in North Wales

  At the end of May, with marking almost complete, staff in English refocused their attention on research at an Away Day event in Gladstone’s Library in Hawarden, North Wales. In the inspiring environment of this wonderful Victorian place, and blessed with brilliant sunshine, we discussed our postgraduate provision, our public engagement activities and funding for research. There was time too to share research ideas – and moderate our marking. Conversations, animated or quiet, took place in various corners of the library and its grounds. Colleagues found new connections in their research work, and took a rare opportunity just to talk about what they’d been reading. We even found time for a country ramble – which, when confronted with a series of stern signs, revealed that some of the English team are more inclined to risk-taking behaviour than others (you know who you are!) ...
Read More
Rachel Willie Awarded Prestigious Book Prize

Rachel Willie Awarded Prestigious Book Prize

LJMU English's Rachel Willie, together with co-editors Kevin Killeen and Helen Smith from the University of York, have been awarded the Roland H. Bainton Prize (for Reference Works) for The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England, c. 1530-1700. This was published by Oxford University Press in 2015, and contains forty essays from leading international scholars on the role of the Bible in sixteenth and seventeenth century life, exploring how the scriptures served as a generative motor for ideas, and a resource for creative and political thought, as well as for domestic and devotional life. It contains Rachel's own essay, 'All Scripture is given by inspiration of God : Dissonance and psalmody'. This prestigious prize is awarded by the Council of the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference. Congratulations Rachel!  ...
Read More

Dr Rachel Willie

Rachel Willie My research covers seventeenth century literary history and culture. My first book, Staging the Revolution: drama, reinvention and history, 1647-72 (shortlisted for the University English Early Career Book Prize, 2016) offers a reappraisal of drama, both in terms of live performances and performances on the paper stage. My book argues that, far from 1660 marking a watershed moment as is often asserted in the texts transmitted in the Restoration and assumed to be true by later critics, late seventeenth-century England was concerned with the continuing legacies of recent history and this is revealed in literature printed and disseminated in the period. While researching this book, I became intrigued by the number of anonymous scurrilous pamphlets ‘by the man in the moon’ and I have begun a wider study on ‘long seventeenth-century’ responses to the moon as an embodied and as a philosophical construct. With Kevin Killeen and Helen Smith, both based at the University of York, I co-edited The Oxford...
Read More