Studying English: From Southern to LJMU

Studying English: From Southern to LJMU

Tyler Korponai is a English major at Southern Connecticut State University, LJMU's transatlantic partner. He is studying on the English programme this semester. Here, he shares his advice to Southern students planning to study English abroad at LJMU.  As a Southern Connecticut State University student investigating the English program at Liverpool John Moores University, there are some distinctions between these two universities’ programs of which you should be conscious. Before beginning classes it would be to your benefit to prepare yourself for a different orientation and style of teaching. You should attempt to contact lecturers, who are akin to professors, module leaders, who are essentially directors of an individual course and communicate with lecturers, and finally your Learning Technology Officer, who would be in charge of connecting you electronically with faculty on Blackboard. If all has been done properly before your departure, the names of your modules, lecturers, and at least one contact in the English department should be in your possession. Being connected early...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Understanding the US University System

Study Abroad at SCSU: Understanding the US University System

I take real solace in that if in the post below I am unable to fully explain the American system compared to the UK system that it is primarily because no one else seems to completely understand it either. I have heard the process of applying for classes as 'a bit like the Hunger Games' more than once. Now, as an international Study Abroad student, a lot of this will not be applicable to you. But it is important to understand the people who will surround you every day. So why is your classmate taking a ‘level 200’ History class as a 6th year Senior? Let's find out... As I explain the most basic basics, it should be clear that despite its complexities, the US system offers more opportunities to study a varied range of subjects and modules than we're used to in the UK. Whereas at home we are 'Majors' from day one of university, the American system offers scope for students to...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: English in America

Study Abroad at SCSU: English in America

Featured Image: 'Flag' by Jasper Johns, 1954, in the Museuem of Modern Art, NYC This summer sixteen lucky LJMU students had the opportunity to spend 3 weeks at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, USA, and I was one of them. Our two universities have set up a 'transatlantic alliance' to open up possibilities for study abroad for their students. SCSU laid on a full and exciting programme of activities across Connecticut for us, and these are my English-related highlights! Libraries I Saw Obviously the first thing I needed to know as an English student abroad was, where is the nearest library? Southern's Hilton .C. Buley Library on campus was my first stop. Don't tell the Aldham Robarts, but it was a pretty impressive building, smack bang in the middle of the beautiful New Haven campus (the sunshine helped too, I guess). The library boasts some very fancy Tiffany stained-glass windows and, most importantly, its own Starbucks, not to mention an array of spectacular and comfortable chairs...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Using the Library

Study Abroad at SCSU: Using the Library

Going to study at SCSU (or thinking about it)? This post is part of a series to help orientate you to their campus. Your guide is LJMU English intern Rupert French.. You’ll be pleased to know that for all the complex differences between the systems of Higher Education in the US and Britain, the SCSU library (aka The Hilton C. Buley Library) remains very library-ish. But there are some differences for users to be aware of to get the most out of their study time. The library is at the centre of campus and during semester is open from 8am-11pm.During the summer months this changes to 7.30pm. 

Much the same as LJMU, there are plenty of computers, but not enough for everyone at every time. As a Study Abroad student, you will have your own account to log in to these desk-top computers. You can reserve study rooms online as well as solo study on particular computers with any necessary software for your particular course. Perhaps the key difference when you're...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: New Haven’s Other University

Study Abroad at SCSU: New Haven’s Other University

This might sound familiar. New Haven, like some other cities you might be able to think of, has another university, one which, to the ill-informed, might seem slightly more prestigious. Now clearly your loyalties are to SCSU, but that's not to say you shouldn't aim to take full advantage of what the Other University has to offer you as a New Haven resident. Because, unlike some other Other Universities, this one is nothing if not generous with its assets...   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGn3-RW8Ajk&w=560&h=315   Well, I think you'll agree, that's a hard act to follow. But follow it I must, with some suggestions as to how you can make the most of Yale.     Free Tour of the Yale Campus Mon-Fri:  149 Elm Street. 10.30am-2.00pm. Sat & Sun: 149 Elm Street. 1.30pm. Yale is right there for you to see wherever you go in the centre of New Haven, but it is totally worth taking an hour out of your weekend or afternoon to learn some of the history of one of...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: Hiking in New Haven

Study Abroad at SCSU: Hiking in New Haven

As Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer continually remind us, it is all about location, location, location. New Haven can be seen as the ideal town for the New Yorker with a need for space. When you live here, you’re a two hour train journey away from the city that never kips, the Big Apple, the capital of the world, the centre of the universe, the big city, the melting pot, the modern Gomorrah… Scratch that last one. 

Either way you’re in a prime spot, but it would be doing New Haven, Connecticut a disservice not to talk about the opportunities that are only a 20 minute drive away, and which don’t involve smog. 

So - let's go hiking! You have plenty of trails, from easy to moderate to moderately easy, some of which you can walk to from campus in about 10 minutes. The Sleeping Giant:  These trails out in Hamden are so called because from a distance the sequence of hills look...
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Study Abroad at SCSU: A Few Tips on Tipping From an Over-Anxious Tipper

Study Abroad at SCSU: A Few Tips on Tipping From an Over-Anxious Tipper

Now, you should be tipping in pubs and restaurants anyway. Because it’s polite and you seem nice enough. However, if you’re not in the habit of tipping in general, or only for a slightly more up-market meal, the policy of tipping in the USA can be an absolute minefield. 

Let’s start with some basics: Who not to tip: The Air Hostess on your way here. Customs officials. Connecticut State Police officials. The person serving you at the Shop ’n’ Save at the check out counter. Bus driver. Your fellow students. Your tutor. Me for this post. The Air Hostess on your way back. However, in the US, tipping is required of any service under hospitality. The money added on to your initial bill is not a tip, it is (the US equivalent of) VAT. So what you see advertised and what you will pay is generally slightly different and slightly more. America is a tipping culture. Where we are happy giving 10% at a restaurant and occasionally buying an attractive bar person a...
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Literary Connecticut: The Mark Twain and Harriet Beecher Stowe houses

Literary Connecticut: The Mark Twain and Harriet Beecher Stowe houses

Located in Hartford, the Mark Twain and Harriet Beecher Stowe houses are a must-see for any literature students visiting Connecticut. Twain and his wife Olivia commissioned the New York architect Edward Tuckerman Potter to design their elaborate home in 1873, and they moved in during September 1874. The house was as fancy and huge as we were promised it would be. Taking photographs inside was strictly prohibited (sorry to disappoint). So too was touching anything except the handrail on the stairs which, as it happened, was so low that it didn't feel safe to lean down and hold onto, so I declined to take part in that sensory experience of Twain's former home. The house has been restored to resemble the decadence that Twain decided it was necessary for his family to live in. The walls of the entrance hall were hand stencilled with intricate silver patterns, the house was full of fancy paintings, the woodwork and the handrail on the stairs were gorgeously...
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