Reading English Module.

Reading English Module.

This is quite a fast-paced module, structured in three parts - focussing in turn on poetry (including 'V' by Tony Harrison - amazing, and Shakespeare's Sonnets), prose (Wuthering Heights - see T.E.A's separate post for this) and drama (Endgame by Samuel Beckett). This module, for me, felt quite different from the others, due to the varied material. Kate Walchester says: "The aim of 'Reading English' is to ease your transition into the undergraduate study of English Literature by introducing you to a wide range of texts from different periods, refreshing your knowledge of literary terms and techniques, and supporting you as you write your first research essay". This module may feel like a bit of a rollercoaster, unnerving at times, but it is exactly because of this feeling that the module is so enjoyable. It allows you the opportunity to explore the variations in literature. When it comes to choosing your modules for level 5, you will have a good idea of the different areas of study - for...
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Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë.

This is one of the texts you will study on the Reading English module. First of all let me just say that this novel is NOT a typical 'chick love story' (as one person put it in my seminar group). Heathcliff is far from the romantic hero, if he can be considered that at all! This is a far more complex story about greed, class, conflict and consequences. Please do not assume that you can watch a TV or film adaptation and know the story. The novel is far more complex, with intricately woven plot and character relationships. These things are never, in my opinion, portrayed correctly on screen and the novel's gothic atmosphere is usually either overlooked or over-done. I admit that Wuthering Heights is sometimes difficult to get into, I had to go back and start again, as I found I had not taken in the first few chapters, but perseverance with this novel is rewarding. There is so...
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Eating Your Reading List

Eating Your Reading List

Everyone loves a bowl of plain pasta and a pot noodle butty, but a few decent meals here and there can make a huge difference to your life, let alone your ability to study. There’s tons of food advice for students around, but can you use the books on your reading list as a cooking aids? Yes: yes you can. How much fun would it be to eat along with your favourite characters? (The answer is: SO MUCH FUN!) Here’s what culinary delights some of your first year texts have to offer, along with helpful links to simple recipes from the World Wide Web: Wuthering Heights fans can treat themselves to ‘boiled milk or tea’ and a delicious ‘basin of milk porridge’. If you’re feeling very hungry try ‘a plateful of cakes’. Hopefully your accommodation doesn’t make you feel like you’re living on the set of A Taste of Honey, but some ‘biscuits and a flask of coffee’ may brighten your early...
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And the winners are…T.E.A. Competition

And the winners are…T.E.A. Competition

As we know you will remember, a little while ago those lovely folk at The English Appendage came up with a competition asking all LJMU English students to come up with a single image to capture a book, play or poem studied on an English module. After much deliberation, we're now very excited to announce our winners, and they are (drum roll.....): First Prize: Kathrin Shawcross, Wuthering Heights He's mean, she's moody, it doesn't end well.... You've all read this now, so this is not a spoiler. The judges loved the eerie glow of Kathrin's mixed media image. She wins a £50 Amazon voucher, but can only spend this on gothic texts. Probably.   Second Prize: Rich Albinger, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? If you're just finishing Level 4, you've got this to look forward to on your Literary and Cultural Theory module next year. If one can ever really be said to look forward to envisioning a post-apocalyptic future, that is... The judges loved Rich's...
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Wuthering Heights: Reading English Trip to Haworth

Wuthering Heights: Reading English Trip to Haworth

Paul McFerran is an LJMU English and Creative Writing student at Level 4.  I did not know what to expect when we arrived in Haworth. I suppose I had envisioned a dark and dreary village that had not left the 1800s similar to the landscape of the novel Wuthering Heights. Despite these wild imaginings, Haworth had actually progressed with the rest of the world and I was honestly surprised to feel a familiarity with the place, not because I had been before, but because it was somewhat reminiscent of the countryside I had become accustomed to back home in Ireland. From the bus that brought us to our destination, we were guided towards the local church where we were offered some background to the Brontë family and the lives they led. Emily's mother had died of cancer when she was only three, and her younger sisters Maria and Elizabeth died not long after. To learn that Emily had lost so many family members at...
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